Herzog & de Meuron
Project
2019–

SEEING THROUGH THE EAR – a motorway chapel near Andeer

The environs of Andeer are beautiful: mountains, rivers, meadows, and forests. So is the well-preserved village. As if time had stood still. Quiet and peaceful, if it weren’t for the A13, the motorway that connects the village with Chur to the north and, via the San Bernardino, to the canton of Ticino and Italy to the south.

And this is supposed to be location of a chapel? Statistics show that motorway chapels enjoy great popularity, but it is still surprising that the community of Andeer has decided to build one here in this landscape. There are already several chapels in the surroundings, and indeed throughout all of the Grisons. They were built centuries ago and lie embedded in this exquisite landscape. Many of them are architectural and art historical gems, from simple plastered walls to frescoes, painted ceilings, and wood carvings. They are places that encourage people to pray and worship—or simply to stop and rest and marvel for a moment. We are familiar with many of these chapels. We have always admired this architecture for its enduring ability to fascinate people, even more so perhaps because the churches are not embedded in an urban con-text but are a fully functional part of their natural surroundings. It is actually our love of these chapels that made us real-ize we couldn’t use them as an analogous model for today’s contemporary architecture. It is impossible to conjure the aura of old walls without resorting to kitsch.

So there was nothing anywhere in the world that we might have studied and used as a source of inspiration: no typologi-cal models, no churches, no prayer room, no recent architecture. The idea for the chapel in Andeer had to emerge from the site alone, from the location, from the road. And we did not want to work with explicit religious signs or symbols, even less with Christian symbols such as a cross or representations of Christ. We were looking for architecture that would sharpen the perception of visitors—of the location, the natural environs, and even of the way they see themselves. The project is also unusual for us because neither the spatial program nor the location were clearly defined. These ques-tions and, of course, the development of the architectural concept acquired shape in the course of several meetings and fruitful, candid conversations with representatives of the community and the pastor of Andeer.

Initially, there were specific questions to deal with: where should the motorway chapel be built? Not just anywhere in the landscape but alongside a motorway. As close as possible. At one point we even thought of building it above the motor-way. Then we discovered that there was already a bridge across the road connecting the village and the landscape. We made countless designs, including a covered bridge, like a little basilica above the road. A possibility that we had to abandon because it was too costly, but we did like the idea of a bridge that connects. A path to a place, in fact, a path as place… or even right through the chapel? But how would a space like that work?

Because of the location next to a motorway, we knew we would have to deal with the noise. Literally. The noise of the street that we wanted to overcome and leave behind on entering the chapel. Not just a single door separating inside and outside acoustically and spatially but a sequence of spaces, of different and distinct chambers—like the human ear. Acoustic waves enter the auditory canal, penetrating deeper and deeper, via various stations, until our brain converts them into sounds that we perceive and identify as such.

We explored a sequence of that kind in developing our design. But we avoided an anthropomorphic analogy because the first organically inspired sketches and models did not convince us. We wanted to find something else, something more archaic. Something that would instantly target human perception: the altered perception of sounds and sights.

We started out with a shape as abstract as possible, a kind of placeholder, a solid white cube, with a variety of zones defining its complex inner life. Very introverted. The deeper you go, the weaker the sounds from the motorway and the stronger the sound of your own footsteps. Finally, when you reach the last room, strong daylight streams into the heart of the chapel and you see a panoramic view of the landscape, the village, and the lush green meadows and woods. Per-ception of the vegetation is heightened by the complementary red of a room-height pane of tinted glass. The sun, setting in the evening, shines through the red glass into this last portion of the chapel, which leads directly to the landscape out-side.

We wanted the architecture to reinforce perception. Just like this last section, we wanted each part of the chapel to have a specific quality, a focus of its own. Ordinary, even trivial things: for example, a view of the sky, concentration while reading, or the perception of sounds, external and internal, like our footsteps or our breathing. We realized that the closed cube could not meet the specifications. It was too hermetic and too architectural. We had to start hunting again. We wanted to create space but not a closed architectural volume. It should be more like a path coming from outside, passing through a sequence of specific rooms, and then leading directly outdoors again. But we did not really perceive this as a path until we laid it through the earth, like a passage through an organism or cave. We realized that we now had the po-tential of not just one but many analogies and associations, which is what we had wanted to achieve from the very start. The last room with the red pane of glass opens up into a cave-like oval, reminiscent of the early Christian or heathen sites that archaeologists have discovered in the neighboring community of Zillis. Along the funnel-shaped earth space, visitors find two other small chapels: the first for readers, with even daylight coming into the round room from above and the second with a candle, a matte, reflecting wall, and a single skylight. This is the most personal place for visitors; here they are confronted with themselves.

In short, the earth room is conceived as a sequence of chapels with a ground-level exit facing west as well as access from above, down a broad, snail-shaped flight of stairs. The latter is like a hole in the ground or like a drain, or maybe even like the round opening of a dome. We did not want to define it but we did want to enclose or surround it, like a gar-den or courtyard. That meant four walls of equal height and at right angles, but not as part of the fixed walls of a room: that would have been too much like a building again. The walls just lean against each other; they lean and support at the same time. One of them stands upright. Almost like the wall of a choir. A simple gesture that emerged almost in play.

Herzog & de Meuron, 2020

Die Natur ist schön bei Andeer: Berge, FlĂĽsse, Wiesen und Wälder. Das Dorf, mit gut erhaltenen Gebäuden aus vergan-genen Zeiten, auch. Die Zeit wie still. Wenig Hektik – wäre da nicht eine Nationalstrasse, die A13. Sie verbindet das Dorf im Norden mit Chur und im SĂĽden via San Bernardino mit dem Tessin und Italien.

Ausgerechnet hier an dieser Strasse soll nun eine Kapelle entstehen? Autobahnkirchen werden rege besucht – das zeigen Statistiken. Dennoch überrascht die Idee der Gemeinde Andeer, gerade hier, in dieser Landschaft, eine Autobahnkapelle bauen zu wollen. In der Umgebung gibt es ja bereits einige Kapellen, wie übrigens auf dem ganzen Gebiet von Graubün-den. Sie wurden vor Jahrhunderten gebaut und liegen eingebettet in diese traumhafte Landschaft. Viele davon sind archi-tektonische und kunsthistorische Kostbarkeiten: seien es einfache, verputzte Mauern oder auch mit Fresken; Deckenma-lereien, Holzschnitzereien. Es sind Orte, die uns anziehen, zum Beten und zum Gottesdienst – aber auch einfach zum Staunen, Verweilen und Innehalten. Viele dieser Kapellen kennen wir. Wir haben diese Bauwerke immer dafür bewundert, dass sie bis heute Menschen faszinieren, gerade weil sie nicht in einem städtischen Kontext eingebunden sind, sondern wie ein Teil der Natur funktionieren. Gerade weil wir diese alten Kapellen lieben, war uns klar, dass wir sie nicht als ana-loges Leitbild für heute – für eine zeitgenössische Architektur – verwenden konnten. Man kann die Aura alter Mauern nicht herbeizaubern, ohne beim Kitsch zu landen.

Es gab also keine typologischen Vorbilder, keine Kirche, kein Gebetsraum – auch nicht kürzlich gebaute Architekturen ir-gendwo sonst auf der Welt, die wir hätten anschauen wollen im Hinblick auf die Andeerer Kapelle. Das ganze Konzept sollte nur aus dem Ort hier an dieser Strasse heraus entwickelt werden. Wir wollten ja auch nicht mit christlichen Symbo-len – wie Kreuz oder Christusdarstellungen – vorangehen und den Besucher vereinnahmen mit expliziten religiösen Zei-chen und Symbolen. Wir suchten nach einer Architektur, welche die sinnliche Wahrnehmung des Menschen schärft – und zwar in Bezug auf den Ort, die Natur und auf sich selbst.

Das Projekt ist für uns aussergewöhnlich, auch weil weder das Raumprogramm noch der Ort eindeutig festgelegt waren. Das alles, und natürlich die Entwicklung des architektonischen Konzepts, entstand in mehreren Begegnungen und sehr offenen Gesprächen mit Gemeindevertretern und dem Pfarrer von Andeer.

Zunächst waren also nur Fragen, etwa: Wo soll die Autobahnkapelle hinkommen? Nicht irgendwo in der Landschaft, son-dern an der Autobahn. Möglichst nahe. Wir probierten zunächst gar ein Konzept direkt über der Autobahn. Da entdeckten wir die bestehende Brücke über die Strasse, welche Dorf und Landschaft verbindet. Wir machten viele Entwürfe, darunter auch eine eingehauste Brücke, wie eine kleine Basilika über der Strasse. Dieses Konzept liessen wir fallen, weil es zu aufwändig war; aber uns gefiel die Idee der Brücke als Weg der Verbindung. Ein Weg zum Ort, ja ein Weg als Ort… gar durch die Kapelle hindurch? Aber wie sollte ein solcher Raum funktionieren?

Wegen des Standorts unmittelbar an der Schnellstrasse hatten wir auch den Lärm von Beginn an in unserem Sinn. Wort-wörtlich. Lärm als Geräusch der Strasse, das wir überwinden und hinter uns lassen wollten, mit dem Betreten der Kapel-le. Nicht durch eine einzige Türe, welche Innen und Aussen akustisch und räumlich trennt, sondern durch eine räumliche Sequenz, eine Abfolge von Raumkammern ganz unterschiedlicher Ausprägung – wie beim menschlichen Ohr. Dort dringt die akustische Welle ja durch den Gehörgang immer tiefer ins Innere und landet über verschiedene Stationen schliesslich umgewandelt zu einem akustischen Signal in unserem Gehirn, wo wir das Geräusch als solches wahrnehmen und erken-nen können.

Für die Entwicklung des Entwurfs wollten wir eine solche Sequenz untersuchen. Wir vermieden dabei aber eine anthro-pomorphe Analogie, weil uns erste Skizzen und Modelle mit organischer Formenvielfalt nicht überzeugten. Wir suchten etwas Anderes und Archaischeres. Es sollte unmittelbar auf die fokussierte Wahrnehmung des Menschen gerichtet sein: auf eine veränderte Wahrnehmung der Geräusche und des Schauens.

Als Gebäudevolumen diente uns zunächst – quasi als Platzhalter – eine möglichst abstrakte Figur: ein geschlossener weisser Würfel mit einem komplexen Innenleben verschiedener Raumzonen. Sehr introvertiert. Je tiefer man eindringt, desto schwächer sollte die Strasse tönen und zugleich umso kräftiger der Klang der eigenen Schritte. Schliesslich, in ei-nem letzten Raum angekommen, dringt plötzlich starkes Tageslicht ins Innere der Kapelle und eröffnet einen panorami-schen Blick auf die Landschaft, hin zum Dorf und dem saftigen Grün der Wiesen und Wälder. Die Wahrnehmung dieses Grüns wird noch verstärkt durch die komplementäre Farbwirkung einer raumhohen, rot eingefärbten Glasscheibe. Die tief-liegende Abendsonne scheint durch das rote Glas in diesen letzten Raumabschnitt der Kapelle. Von dort gelangt man di-rekt hinaus in die Landschaft.

Eine durch Architektur unterstützte sinnliche Wahrnehmung suchten wir. Genau wie dieser letzte Raumabschnitt sollten aber alle Teile der Kapelle eine spezifische Qualität haben, einen eigenen Fokus sozusagen. Alltägliche, ja banale Dinge: zum Beispiel der Blick zum Himmel, die Konzentration beim Lesen oder die Wahrnehmung von Geräuschen – äusseren und inneren – verursacht durch die eigenen Schritte oder den Atem. Der anfänglich gewählte geschlossene Kubus konnte das aber nicht leisten. Er wirkte zu hermetisch und zu architektonisch. Wir mussten also weitersuchen. Wir wollten Raum schaffen, aber kein geschlossenes architektonisches Volumen. Es sollte doch eher ein Weg sein, von aussen kommend, durch eine Sequenz von spezifischen Räumen hindurch und dann direkt wieder ins Freie. Dieser Weg wurde aber erst wirklich als solcher wahrgenommen, als wir ihn durch das Erdreich hindurchführten. Wie durch einen Organis-mus oder eine Höhle. Wir erkannten, dass nun nicht eine, sondern eine Vielzahl von Analogien oder Assoziationen mög-lich wurden, was wir ja von Beginn an anstrebten. Der letzte Raum mit der roten Scheibe öffnet sich in einem höhlenarti-gen Oval und erinnert dabei an die frühchristliche und heidnische Kultstätte, die Archäologen in der Nachbargemeinde Zil-lis entdeckten. Entlang des trichterförmigen Erdraums eröffnen sich dem Besucher zwei weitere kleine Kapellen: eine ers-te zum Lesen, mit Tageslicht, das gleichmässig von oben in den runden Raum eindringt. Eine zweite, mit Kerze, matt spiegelnder Wandfläche und einem gerichteten einzelnen Oberlicht. Dies ist der persönlichste Ort für die Besuchenden: Hier werden sie mit sich selbst konfrontiert.

Der Erdraum ist also als eine Sequenz von Kapellen konzipiert, mit einem ebenerdigen Ausgang gegen Westen und ei-nem Einstieg von oben über eine breite, schneckenförmig gewundene Treppe. Dieser Einstieg ist wie ein Loch im Boden oder wie ein Ablauf in einem Behälter. Vielleicht auch wie die runde Öffnung in einer Kuppel? Wir wollten das nicht festle-gen, sehr wohl aber einfassen oder umfassen, wie einen Garten oder einen Hof. Dazu braucht es vier Wände, alle gleich gross und rechteckig. Aber nicht zu einem festgemauerten Raum verbunden, was wieder zu sehr wie ein Gebäude wäre. Die Wandflächen lehnen bloss aneinander: jede Wand lehnt und stützt zugleich. Eine dieser vier Tafeln steht aufrecht. Beinahe wie eine Chorwand. Eine einfache Geste, entstanden fast wie im Spiel.

Herzog & de Meuron, 2020

515_CI_2002_01
515_CI_2002_01

515_VD_220930_THUMBNAIL

515_CI_2002_03
515_CI_2002_03
515_SI_181110_155417
515_SI_181110_155417
515_CI_2002_061
515_CI_2002_061
515_MO_1912_001
515_MO_1912_001
515_CI_2002_065
515_CI_2002_065
515_CI_2002_066
515_CI_2002_066
515_CI_2002_02
515_CI_2002_02
515_CI_2002_075
515_CI_2002_075
515_CI_2002_071
515_CI_2002_071
515_CI_2002_04
515_CI_2002_04

Drawings

515_DR_2002_035_Section
515_DR_2002_035_Section
515_DR_2002_032_Plan UG
515_DR_2002_032_Plan UG

Team

Facts

Client
IG Autobahnkirche A13
Planning
Project Architect: Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd, Basel, Switzerland
Cost Consulting: Christen Baukosten - und Projektmanagement, Basel, Switzerland
Structural Engineering: Conzett Bronzini Partner AG, Chur, Switzerland
Specialist / Consulting
Traffic Consulting: Casutt Wyrsch Zwicky AG, Falera, Switzerland
Visualizations: Aron Lorincz Ateliers, Gödöllő, Hungary
Building Data
Gross floor area (GFA): 3'013 sqft, 280 sqm
GFA above ground: 1'399 sqft, 130 sqm
GFA below ground: 1'614 sqft, 150 sqm
Number of levels: 2
Height: 32 ft, 10 m