Herzog & de Meuron
Competition
2011-2012
Project
2014 - planned completion 2024

The Institution of the Children’s Hospital in Zurich

The University Children’s Hospital has been operated by the Eleonoren Foundation since 1874. An international competition launched in 2011 called for a new facility in combination with pioneering hospital architecture. The call for proposals specified the client’s requirements as follows: “We wish to create an atmosphere in which children of all ages and their parents will feel as sheltered and comfortable as possible despite their personal circumstances, and a facility that is architecturally and functionally designed to optimize treatment procedures and the work of the staff.” Herzog & de Meuron won the two-phase competition in 2012.

The mandate of the Children’s Hospital is to supply highly specialized care of children in conjunction with research, teaching, and the fostering of a new generation of academics in the field of child healthcare. The 200-bed hospital is the largest in Switzerland for both inpatient and outpatient care of children and adolescents. The new project in ZĂŒrich-Lengg will replace the facility in the Hottinger quarter, which has long outgrown its current capacity.

The Healthcare Campus in Lengg

The site in Zurich-Lengg lies on the outskirts of the city in a leafy residential district, which is also an important recreational neighborhood for residents of Zurich. Geologically, Burghölzli, as the hill is called, is a protected glacial landscape. Two plots of land on a proverbially green meadow have been earmarked for the new project, which is to be integrated in a campus of institutions devoted to various aspects of healthcare. A close neighbor is the Psychiatric University Clinic (PUK), also known as “Burghölzli,” housed in a listed building of 1869 designed by Johann Caspar Wolff.

The New Children’s Hospital

The project for the Children’s Hospital in ZĂŒrich consists of two buildings: the hospital and a research center. The hospital, on the site to the south, is a distinctly horizontal, three-story structure opposite the “Burghölzli”. The main entrance, a large gate, is exactly opposite the portal of the historical building. The concave gesture of the main façade creates a spacious forecourt for both institutions.

A holistic concept underlies the project, unlike the conventional layout of hospital buildings. These tend to consist of various, often relatively high tracts, which may give patients the impression that they are being shifted back and forth between departments that are separate and distinct and do not work together. The large horizontal shape of the hospital defines the holistic nature of the building, characterized from inside out by a delicacy of material detail.

The words ‘horizontal’ and ‘holistic’ describe the two basic principles, devised by Herzog & de Meuron to meet the requirements of a hospital architecture that responds specifically to the needs of patients and staff. These principles already played a decisive role in 2002 for the REHAB Basel, a special clinic for neuro-rehabilitation and paraplegiology, and apply to another healthcare project underway in Hillerþd, Denmark: the New North Zealand Hospital.

The Children’s Hospital follows an urban grid with streets, intersections, and squares. The functions or departments correspond to neighborhoods. Every floor has a main street. Several green inner courtyards varying in size provide daylight and structure the right-angled layout of the rooms. Nature penetrates deep into the building. Some of the courtyards, round in shape, are arranged along the main street where there is access to the most important areas of the hospital.

The ground floor with its large round entry is the most public zone within the hospital. It accommodates the main facilities for examination and treatment with the highest visitor and patient frequency as well as emergency room, intensive care, and operating rooms. Restaurant and access to therapy services on the first lower level are located right next to the entrance; the latter are connected directly to the garden for patients. On the second floor, both sides of the main street are flanked by further divisions of the polyclinic, which are in turn surrounded by an office landscape oriented towards the outside, with some 600 workplaces for medical and administrative personnel.

The top floor is the most private area of the hospital. Four wards form quadrants in which a total of 114 rooms are arranged in a ring structure oriented towards the outside. Each of the rooms is designed like a little house with its own roof, ensuring privacy for the young patients and their relatives in combination with an expansive view. Inside, four therapeutic divisions—cardiology, oncology, nephrology, and the center for brain injuries—are located along the main street, where children and adolescents can receive transdisciplinary treatment and care in the immediate vicinity of their own rooms. The divisions correspond to the special areas addressed in the research center nearby.

The façade of the hospital is a weave of various materials. The primary, repetitive concrete framework is part of the support structure and resembles shelves usable at both ends that bracket the first and second floors. The framework may be filled in with wood, glass, fabric, or plants to meet the needs of the rooms behind it, such as simultaneous requirements of daylight and privacy. The complex inner life of the hospital with its diversity of uses can thus be perceived from the outside. The third floor, with patient accommodations, speaks a language of its own. It is set back from the concrete structure of the two floors below. Each of the rooms can be identified for they are staggered in arrangement with roofs of varying inclines: the little houses lend expression in an elementary, understandable way to the individuality of each patient.

Building for Teaching and Research

The building is located on the parcel to the north. It is a cylindrical, white structure in which rooms for university hospital uses are organized around a center as a leitmotif for collaboration. A sky-oriented, five-story high atrium provides a central space for researchers. An agora for teaching spreads out underneath, relating directly to the surrounding landscape. The two superimposed main spaces of the building are like communicating vessels, connected by a small, round opening in the ceiling – an oculus.

Three lecture halls are pressed like steps into the hollow of the existing topography. Daylight comes in from outside. Fitted with operable partitions, the halls can be converted into a large space with lobby and cafĂ©. For special events, an agora can thus be created for an audience of 670 people, like an ancient theater with a stage in the center. This is expanded above into a gallery, with desks for students. Adjoining seminar rooms on the same floor complete the accommodations for university study at the Children’s Hospital. Research and diagnostic laboratories as well as attendant offices with permanent workplaces are organized along the façades of the upper five stories. They offer an unobstructed view of the surrounding landscape. Open writing desks for doctoral students and laboratory staff line the atrium and provide visual lines of contact across several stories.

From the outside, the building speaks an abstract formal idiom with a clear-cut geometry and few materials. Cantilevered balconies with white stucco railings and glazing set far back make the building look both heavy and airy at once.

The two very different buildings of the Children’s Hospital are mutually complementary. The hospital emphasizes the individual: every single patient and the attendant healing process. The Building for Laboratory, Teaching, and Research clearly demonstrates the conviction that pioneering breakthroughs in research are possible only through transdisciplinary scientific cooperation.

Herzog & de Meuron, 2022

Die Institution Kinderspital ZĂŒrich

Das UniversitĂ€ts-Kinderspital ZĂŒrich wird seit 1874 von der Eleonorenstiftung betrieben. Zur Realisierung eines Neubaus wurde 2011 ein internationaler Wettbewerb mit dem Ziel ausgeschrieben, nicht nur ein neues Spital, sondern auch eine wegweisende Architektur zu schaffen. Worin der konkrete Anspruch des Auftraggebers liegt, wird im Ausschreibungstext benannt: „Wir wĂŒnschen uns die Erschaffung eines Ortes mit Ausstrahlung, an dem sich sowohl Kleinkinder als auch Jugendliche und deren Eltern trotz ihres individuellen Schicksals so wohl und geborgen fĂŒhlen wie möglich, und der durch seine architektonische und funktionale Ausgestaltung den Behandlungsprozess und die Arbeit der Mitarbeitenden weitest möglich unterstĂŒtzt.“ Herzog & de Meuron wurden 2012 nach einem zweistufigen Verfahren als Architekten ausgewĂ€hlt.

Der Leistungsauftrag des Kinderspitals ZĂŒrich liegt in der hochspezialisierten Versorgung von Kindern und Jugendlichen in Kombination mit Forschung, Lehre und akademischer Nachwuchsförderung auf dem Gebiet der Kinderheilkunde. Es ist das grösste Spital fĂŒr die stationĂ€re und ambulante Behandlung von Kindern und Jugendlichen in der Schweiz mit ĂŒber 200 Betten. Das Neubauprojekt in ZĂŒrich-Lengg wird das Spital im Hottinger Quartier ersetzen, welches schon seit geraumer Zeit an seine KapazitĂ€tsgrenzen gestossen ist.

Der Gesundheits-Campus auf der Lengg

Der Bauplatz in ZĂŒrich-Lengg liegt an der Stadtgrenze, in einem sehr durchgrĂŒnten Wohnquartier, das gleichzeitig ein bedeutsames Naherholungsgebiet ist. Der HĂŒgel mit dem Namen Burghölzli ist geologisch betrachtet Teil einer geschĂŒtzten Glaziallandschaft. FĂŒr das Neubauprojekt auf der sprichwörtlich grĂŒnen Wiese stehen zwei GrundstĂŒcke innerhalb eines Campus verschiedener Institutionen aus dem Bereich des Gesundheitswesens zur VerfĂŒgung. In unmittelbarer Nachbarschaft liegt die Psychiatrische UniversitĂ€tsklinik (PUK), das „Burghölzli“, ein Bau von Johann Caspar Wolff aus dem Jahr 1869, der unter Denkmalschutz steht.

Das neue Kinderspital

Das Projekt fĂŒr das Kinderspital ZĂŒrich besteht aus zwei GebĂ€uden: Einem Akutspital und einem Forschungszentrum. Das Akutspital auf dem Areal SĂŒd ist eine dreigeschossige, ausgesprochen horizontale Struktur vis-Ă -vis des „Burghölzli“. Der Haupteingang, ein grosses Tor, liegt dem Portal des historischen GebĂ€udes exakt gegenĂŒber. Durch die konkave Geste der Eingangsfassade entsteht ein grosszĂŒgiger gemeinsamer Vorplatz fĂŒr beide Institutionen.

Das Projekt stellt gĂ€ngigen Merkmalen von Spitalbauten Ganzheitlichkeit als Konzept gegenĂŒber. HĂ€ufig setzen sich diese aus verschiedenen, nicht selten hohen GebĂ€udetrakten zusammen, wodurch beim Patienten der Eindruck entstehen kann, zwischen nicht zusammenarbeitenden Abteilungen hin- und hergeschoben zu werden.

Ganzheitlichkeit manifestiert sich beim Akutspital in der horizontal organisierten Grossform und in der von Innen nach Aussen durchgÀngigen, feingliedrigen Materialisierung.

Beide Grundprinzipien, die HorizontalitĂ€t und die Ganzheitlichkeit sind aus dem Bewusstsein fĂŒr Patienten und Mitarbeitende entwickelte Ziele und AnsprĂŒche an die Architektur von Spitalbauten bei Herzog & de Meuron. Sie waren schon 2002 fĂŒr das REHAB Basel, eine Spezialklinik fĂŒr Neurorehabilitation und Paraplegiologie, massgebend und werden parallel zum Projekt fĂŒr das Kinderspital ZĂŒrich beim New North Zealand Hospital in Hillerod (DĂ€nemark) weiterverfolgt.

Das Akutspital funktioniert wie eine Rasterstadt mit Strassen, Kreuzungen und PlĂ€tzen. Die Funktionsbereiche sind ihre Quartiere. Jedes Geschoss verfĂŒgt ĂŒber eine Hauptstrasse. Eine Vielzahl von bepflanzten Innenhöfen unterschiedlicher Grösse belichtet und strukturiert das rechtwinklig organisierte RaumgefĂŒge. Die Natur dringt tief ins GebĂ€ude ein. Einige Höfe heben sich durch ihre runde Form ab, sie sind der Hauptstrasse entlang dort angeordnet, wo ZugĂ€nge zu den wichtigsten Funktionsbereichen liegen.

Das Erdgeschoss mit grossem rundem Eingangshof ist die öffentlichste Zone innerhalb des Spitals. Hier befinden sich zentrale Untersuchungs- und Behandlungsbereiche mit der höchsten Frequenz an Besuchern und Patienten, inklusive Notfall- und Intensivpflegestationen sowie OperationssĂ€len. In unmittelbarer NĂ€he zum Eingang liegen das Restaurant und der Zugang zu Therapiebereichen im ersten Untergeschoss, die ĂŒber einen direkten Bezug zum Patientengarten verfĂŒgen. Im Zentrum des ersten Obergeschosses befinden sich beidseits der Hauptstrasse weitere Teile der Poliklinik. Sie sind von einer nach aussen orientierten BĂŒrolandschaft mit rund 600 ArbeitsplĂ€tzen fĂŒr das medizinische und administrative Personal umgeben.

Das Dachgeschoss ist der privateste Bereich innerhalb des Akutspitals. Vier Bettenstationen sind als Quadranten ausgebildet, in denen insgesamt 114 Zimmer in einer Ringstruktur angeordnet und nach aussen orientiert sind. Jedes einzelne Zimmer ist als kleines Haus mit eigenem Dach angelegt, das den jungen Patienten und ihren Angehörigen PrivatsphĂ€re bei uneingeschrĂ€nkten Ausblick bietet. Im Innern des Geschosses befinden sich entlang der Hauptstrasse vier therapeutische Zentren, in denen Kinder und Jugendliche disziplinĂŒbergreifend und in direkter NĂ€he zu ihren Zimmern behandelt und betreut werden:

das Herz-, das Onkologie-, das Nephrologiezentrum und das Zentrum fĂŒr Brandverletzungen. Sie entsprechen den Spezialgebieten des Forschungszentrums in unmittelbarer Nachbarschaft.

Die Fassade des Spitals besteht aus einem Geflecht verschiedener Materialien. Eine primĂ€re, raumhaltige, repetitive Betonstruktur, die Teil des Tragwerks ist, fasst wie ein beidseitig bespielbares Regal Erdgeschoss und erstes Obergeschoss zusammen. Die Art der FĂŒllungen aus Holz, Glas, Stoff und Pflanzen variiert in AbhĂ€ngigkeit zum Eigenschaftsprofil der dahinterliegenden RĂ€ume, beispielsweise dem gleichzeitigen BedĂŒrfnis nach Tageslicht und PrivatsphĂ€re. Dadurch kommt das komplexe Innenleben des Spitals mit seiner Vielfalt an Nutzungen in seinem Äusseren zum Ausdruck. Das dritte Geschoss, welches die Bettenstationen aufnimmt, spricht eine eigene Sprache. Es ist gegenĂŒber der Betonstruktur der unteren zwei Geschosse zurĂŒckversetzt. Durch die Staffelung der Patientenzimmer und die unterschiedlichen Neigungen ihrer DĂ€cher ist jedes einzelne Zimmer ablesbar: die IndividualitĂ€t jedes Patienten wird mit dem kleinen Haus in einer elementaren, verstĂ€ndlichen Form ausgedrĂŒckt.

Das GebĂ€ude fĂŒr Lehre und Forschung liegt auf dem Areal Nord. Es ist ein zylindrischer, weisser Bau, in dem RĂ€ume fĂŒr die universitĂ€re Spitalnutzung mit Zusammenarbeit als Leitmotiv um eine Mitte organisiert sind. Die Mitte ist ein zum Himmel gerichtetes, fĂŒnfgeschossiges Atrium als Zentralraum fĂŒr die Forschenden. Darunter breitet sich eine Agora fĂŒr die Lehre aus, die in direktem Bezug zur umgebenden Landschaft steht. Die beiden ĂŒbereinander liegenden HauptrĂ€ume des GebĂ€udes sind wie kommunizierende GefĂ€sse durch eine kleine, runde Öffnung in der Decke, ein „Oculus“ miteinander verbunden.

Drei HörsĂ€le drĂŒcken sich treppenartig in die GelĂ€ndemulde der bestehenden Topographie ein. Tageslicht dringt von aussen ein, bewegliche TrennwĂ€nde ermöglichen es, die HörsĂ€le mit Foyer und CafĂ© zu einem Grossraum zusammenzuschalten. So kann fĂŒr aussergewöhnliche Veranstaltungen eine Agora fĂŒr 670 Zuschauer in der Art eines antiken Theaters mit einer BĂŒhne als Zentrum geschaffen werden. Diese weitet sich nach oben zu einer Galerie aus, auf der offene ArbeitsplĂ€tze fĂŒr Studierende angeordnet sind. Angrenzende SeminarrĂ€ume auf dem gleichen Geschoss komplettieren das Angebot fĂŒr die universitĂ€re Lehre am Kinderspital. Forschungs- und Diagnostiklabore sowie dazugehörige BĂŒros mit stĂ€ndigen ArbeitsplĂ€tzen sind in den oberen fĂŒnf Geschossen entlang der Fassaden organisiert. Sie gewĂ€hren uneingeschrĂ€nkten Ausblick in die umgebende Landschaft. Offene Schreib-ArbeitsplĂ€tze fĂŒr Doktoranden und Labormitarbeitende sĂ€umen das Atrium und eröffnen geschossĂŒbergreifende Blickbeziehungen.

Von aussen spricht das GebĂ€ude eine abstrakte Formensprache mit klarer Geometrie und wenigen Materialien. Auskragende Balkone mit weiss verputzten BrĂŒstungen und weit zurĂŒckversetzte Verglasungen lassen das GebĂ€ude gleichzeitig schwer und luftig erscheinen.

Die beiden GebÀude des Kinderspitals ergÀnzen sich in ihrer Unterschiedlichkeit. Im Akutspital steht das Individuum, jeder einzelne Patient und sein Heilungsverlauf im Zentrum. Im LLF manifestiert sich die Haltung, dass ohne verbindliche Zusammenarbeit unter Wissenschaftlern keine zukunftsweisende Forschung stattfindet.

Herzog & de Meuron, 2022

377_CI_1611_DT14_Entrance-zoom-ET1
377_CI_1611_DT14_Entrance-zoom-ET1
377_CI_1611_DT18_Courtyard-circular-ET1
377_CI_1611_DT18_Courtyard-circular-ET1
377_CI_1612_DT02_Foyer_001
377_CI_1612_DT02_Foyer_001
377_CI_BI_110509_002_SOUTH PLOT ESPLANADE
377_CI_BI_110509_002_SOUTH PLOT ESPLANADE
377_CI_1611_DT19_Entrance_LLF_10_B
377_CI_1611_DT19_Entrance_LLF_10_B
377_CI_1606_025_N_DT01_Auditorium_Open
377_CI_1606_025_N_DT01_Auditorium_Open

Process

Located in a cluster of health care institutions in Zurich, the University Children’s Hospital includes two very different, complementary buildings: a pediatric hospital on the south plot and lab building on the north plot.

377_CI_1708_151_G_LAGEPLAN_mit_grundstuecksgrenzen
377_CI_1708_151_G_LAGEPLAN_mit_grundstuecksgrenzen
377_DR_1611_065_G_DIA-Typologien-01
377_DR_1611_065_G_DIA-Typologien-01
377_DR_1611_065_G_DIA-Typologien-02
377_DR_1611_065_G_DIA-Typologien-02
377_MO_1510_003_S_Mo_Model_1_200
377_MO_1510_003_S_Mo_Model_1_200

Giving form to the hospital on a plot that has no specific shape. Fixed building elements – columns, cores, and courtyards – are arranged to provide flexibility.

377_DG_171102_S_ISO_Dach
377_DG_171102_S_ISO_Dach
377_PP_200514_022_gta_slide
377_PP_200514_022_gta_slide

A single three-story structure: two for treatment areas and offices, and bedwards on top. Courtyards connected along a ‘main street’ on all 3 floors provide intuitive wayfinding, daylight and nature throughout the large building.

377_DG_161207_VORSTELLUNG-BP_SUED_86-01
377_DG_161207_VORSTELLUNG-BP_SUED_86-01
377_DG_171102_Boulevards
377_DG_171102_Boulevards
377_CI_1611_DT18_Courtyard-circular-ET1
377_CI_1611_DT18_Courtyard-circular-ET1
377_CI_1612_DT02_Foyer_001
377_CI_1612_DT02_Foyer_001
377_CI_1611_090_S_INT_BoulevardEG
377_CI_1611_090_S_INT_BoulevardEG

56 clinics and functional units are organized like neighborhoods along the ‘main street’, similar in scale to the Niederdorf main street in Zurich’s medieval old town.

377_PP_200514_024_gta_slide
377_PP_200514_024_gta_slide
377_CI_1704_071_S_DIA_Bueros-neue-Diagramme_4
377_CI_1704_071_S_DIA_Bueros-neue-Diagramme_4
377_SI_170419_Niederdorf_V5_edit_200326_CROPPED
377_SI_170419_Niederdorf_V5_edit_200326_CROPPED

A mixed-material structure combining concrete, wood, glass and plants. A full-scale mockup to study the two-storey concrete frame with wooden infills and patient rooms on top with a large window and an individual roof.

377_CI_1611_DT14_Entrance-zoom-ET1_ZOOM

377_CI_1903_036_S_ChB_Holzelementbau
377_CI_1903_036_S_ChB_Holzelementbau
377_MU_1805_S_FAS_IMG_1461
377_MU_1805_S_FAS_IMG_1461
377_CO_00_IMG_5885_CROP
377_CO_00_IMG_5885_CROP

Patient rooms with wooden ceilings and floors, with a sofa bed for parents.

377_CI_1802_085_S_INT_PZ_EZ_Weiss_Bullauge-ohne-Vorhang
377_CI_1802_085_S_INT_PZ_EZ_Weiss_Bullauge-ohne-Vorhang
377_MU_1805_S_Aussenfassade_02OG_Rundfenster
377_MU_1805_S_Aussenfassade_02OG_Rundfenster

The Building for Laboratory, Teaching, and Research is for collaboration. Labs wrap around a sky-oriented, five-story high atrium that provides natural light through an oculus to the flexible agora for teaching and events on the ground floor.

377_CI_1611_DT19_Entrance_LLF_10_B
377_CI_1611_DT19_Entrance_LLF_10_B
377_PP_200514_014_gta_slide
377_PP_200514_014_gta_slide
377_CI_1606_DT07_Labs Atrium2
377_CI_1606_DT07_Labs Atrium2
377_CI_1606_025_N_DT01_Auditorium_Open
377_CI_1606_025_N_DT01_Auditorium_Open
377_CO_00_STAIRS_IMG_5863
377_CO_00_STAIRS_IMG_5863

Drawings

377_DR_1906_Lageplan01
377_DR_1906_Lageplan01
377_DR_1610_006_S_DIA_UG2
377_DR_1610_006_S_DIA_UG2
377_DR_1610_005_S_DIA_UG1
377_DR_1610_005_S_DIA_UG1
377_DR_1610_001_S_DIA_EG
377_DR_1610_001_S_DIA_EG
377_DR_1610_002_S_DIA_OG1
377_DR_1610_002_S_DIA_OG1
377_DR_1610_003_S_DIA_OG2
377_DR_1610_003_S_DIA_OG2
377_DR_1610_004_S_DIA_DA
377_DR_1610_004_S_DIA_DA
377_DR_1610_006_S_DIA_Schnitt
377_DR_1610_006_S_DIA_Schnitt
377_DR_1610_001_N_DIA_EG
377_DR_1610_001_N_DIA_EG
377_DR_1610_002_N_DIA_OG1
377_DR_1610_002_N_DIA_OG1
377_DR_1610_002_N_DIA_OG2
377_DR_1610_002_N_DIA_OG2
377_DR_1610_004_N_DIA_OG3
377_DR_1610_004_N_DIA_OG3
377_DR_1610_005_N_DIA_OG4
377_DR_1610_005_N_DIA_OG4
377_DR_1610_006_N_DIA_OG5
377_DR_1610_006_N_DIA_OG5
377_DR_1610_007_N_DIA_OG6
377_DR_1610_007_N_DIA_OG6
377_DR_1708_117_N_DIA_Schnitt1
377_DR_1708_117_N_DIA_Schnitt1

Team

Facts

Client
UniversitĂ€ts-Kinderspital ZĂŒrich - Eleonorenstiftung, Zurich, Switzerland
Planning
Architect Planning: ARGE KISPI Gruner AG, Basel Switzerland; Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd., Basel, Switzerland
Landscape Design: August + Margrith KĂŒnzel Landschaftsarchitekten AG, Basel, Switzerland
Electrical Engineering: Amstein + Walthert AG, Zurich, Switzerland
HVAC Engineering : Gruner Gruneko AG, Basel, Switzerland
Structural Engineering: ZPF Ingenieure AG, Basel, Switzerland
Plumbing Engineering: Ingenieurbuero Riesen AG, Bern, Switzerland
Cost Consulting: Gruner AG, Basel, Switzerland
Technical Coordination: Gruner AG, Basel, Switzerland
Specialist / Consulting
Acoustic Consulting: Kopitsis Bauphysik AG, Wohlen, Switzerland
Building Physics Consulting: Kopitsis Bauphysik AG, Wohlen, Switzerland
Civil Engineering: EBP Schweiz AG., Zurich, Switzerland
Facade Consulting: Buri Mueller Partner GmbH, Burgdorf, Switzerland
Facade Consulting: Pirmin Jung Ingenieure AG, Rain, Switzerland
Geometric Consulting: Gruner AG, Basel, Switzerland
Geotechnic Consulting: Dr. H. JĂ€ckli AG, Zurich, Switzerland
Lighting Consulting: LichtKunstLicht AG, Berlin, Germany
Logistics Consulting: AS Intra Move UG, Rheinfelden (Baden), Germany
Security Consulting: Gruner AG, Basel, Switzerland
Sustainability Consulting: Basler & Hofmann West AG, Ingenieure, Planer und Berater, Zollikofen, Switzerland
Traffic Consulting: Gruner AG, Basel, Switzerland
Fire Protection Consulting: Gruner AG, Basel, Switzerland
Audio Planning: RGBP AG, Thalwil, Switzerland
Gastronomy Consulting: Creative Gastro Concept und Design AG, Hergiswil, Switzerland
Vertical Transportation Consulting: AS Intra Move UG, Rheinfelden (Baden), Germany
Hospital Planning & Medical Equipment: Institut fuer Beratung im Gesundheitswesen, (IBG), Aarau, Switzerland
Hospital Planning & Medical Equipment: KOMOXX GmbH Planung & Projektmanagement, ZĂŒrich, Switzerland
Visualization Consulting (Competition): Bloomimages, Hamburg, Germany
Building Data
Site Area: 502'135 sqft, 46'650 sqm
Gross floor area (GFA): 1'012'086 sqft, 94'026 sqm
Footprint: 231'208 sqft, 21'480 sqm
Links
www.kispi.uzh.ch

Bibliography

Irina Davidovici: “H: Hospital-as-City. The Healthcare Architecture of Herzog & de Meuron.” In: Adam Jasper (Ed.). gta papers. Social Distance. Vol. No. 5, Zurich, gta, ETH Zurich, 2021. pp. 118-131.

Julia Moellmann: “Selected Case Studies. Hospitals: Children’s University Hospital Zurich.” In: “The Patient Room. Planning, Design, Layout.” Basel, BirkhĂ€user, 2021. pp. 158-160.

Christine Binswanger, Thomas Hardegger:”Wie baut man ein gutes Spital?” In: Daniel Kurz (Ed.). Werk, Bauen + Wohnen. Spitalbau heute. Zurich, Bauen + Wohnen GmbH, 01.2021. pp. 6-12.

Christine Binswanger, Tina Cieslik: “Mehr Arbeit, aber auch mehr QualitĂ€t. ZĂŒrich bekommt ein neues Kinderspital. Entworfen und geplant wurde von Anfang an mit BIM.” In: Judit Solt (Ed.). “Tec 21. BIM in der Praxis. Neubau Kinderspital ZĂŒrich.” Vol. No. 28, Zurich, Espazium, 18.09.2020. pp. 22-25.

Jacques Herzog, IrĂšne Troxler: “Kein Freipass fĂŒr HĂ€sslichkeit. Jacques Herzog will die FunktionalitĂ€t von Stadien und SpitĂ€lern mit guter Architektur verbinden.” In: Markus Spillmann (Ed.). “Neue ZĂŒrcher Zeitung, Zurich, Neue ZĂŒrcher Zeitung,” 19.05.2017. pp. 18-19.

Luis FernĂĄndez-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva Monografias. Herzog & de Meuron 2013-2017.” Vol. No. 191-192, Madrid, Arquitectura Viva SL, 12.2016.

Location