Herzog & de Meuron
Project
2004-2005
Realization
2006-2007
253_CP_0711_IB_703_5097_H
253_CP_0711_IB_703_5097_H
253_CP_0711_IB_734_5981_H
253_CP_0711_IB_734_5981_H
253_CP_0711_HdM_40_Bond_St_6235
253_CP_0711_HdM_40_Bond_St_6235
253_CP_0711_755_IB
253_CP_0711_755_IB
253_CP_0711_IB_709_5372_H
253_CP_0711_IB_709_5372_H
253_CP_0711_705_IB
253_CP_0711_705_IB
253_CP_0711_735_IB
253_CP_0711_735_IB
253_CP_0711_IB_736_6377_H
253_CP_0711_IB_736_6377_H
253_CP_0711_IB_733_6287_H
253_CP_0711_IB_733_6287_H
253_CP_0711_IB_714_5612_H
253_CP_0711_IB_714_5612_H

Process

Once an exclusive residential area in the nineteenth century, Bond Street in Lower Manhattan has had a colorful history, which is reflected today in its mixture of everything from townhouses to loft buildings.

253_RFCL_0508_SOHO-NOHO_K
253_RFCL_0508_SOHO-NOHO_K
253_RFcl_0408_006_SOHO-NOHO
253_RFcl_0408_006_SOHO-NOHO
253_SI_0406_030_BOND-ST
253_SI_0406_030_BOND-ST
253_RFcl_0408_022_SOHO-NOHO
253_RFcl_0408_022_SOHO-NOHO
253_SI_0407_503_VIEW-EAST
253_SI_0407_503_VIEW-EAST

The design combines two local typologies: five townhouses occupy the lower two floors, above which there are eight floors of apartments; the structure of the building is pushed to the outside and defines a striking facade of large panes of glass.

253_MO_0408_130_Facade_K
253_MO_0408_130_Facade_K
253_MO_0408_079_Facade
253_MO_0408_079_Facade
253_MO_0409_050_Facade_K
253_MO_0409_050_Facade_K
253_MO_0409_113_Facade
253_MO_0409_113_Facade
253_MO_0409_004_Facade
253_MO_0409_004_Facade
253_MO_0505_009_SOUTH_ELEVATION
253_MO_0505_009_SOUTH_ELEVATION
253_SI_0407_502_ELEVATION-N
253_SI_0407_502_ELEVATION-N

Rounded glass cladding conceals the externalized slabs and columns that remove the need for internal columns.

253_MU_0411_062_PROFILE
253_MU_0411_062_PROFILE
253_MU_0411_055_PROFILE
253_MU_0411_055_PROFILE
253_MU_0501_010_SUNGLASS
253_MU_0501_010_SUNGLASS
253_MU_0503_001_CRICURSA
253_MU_0503_001_CRICURSA
253_MU_0507_021_SUNGLASS
253_MU_0507_021_SUNGLASS

Models are created to develop the glass cladding for the support structure. Copper is used on the rear facade.
The width of the glass panes is determined by internal functions; their variety adds rhythm to the grid.

253_CO_0609_314_Cricursa
253_CO_0609_314_Cricursa
253_CO_0609_318_Cricursa
253_CO_0609_318_Cricursa
253_CO_0609_309_Cricursa
253_CO_0609_309_Cricursa
253_MU_0411_001_SUNGLASS
253_MU_0411_001_SUNGLASS
253_MU_0603_037_PMU
253_MU_0603_037_PMU
253_MU_0603_019_AM
253_MU_0603_019_AM
253_CO_0610_015
253_CO_0610_015
253_CO_0702_502_COPPER
253_CO_0702_502_COPPER
253_CO_0704_513
253_CO_0704_513
253_MU_0603_009_PMU
253_MU_0603_009_PMU
253_CP_0711_755_IB
253_CP_0711_755_IB
253_CP_0711_723_IB_K
253_CP_0711_723_IB_K

The architects continue the language of curves in their design for the interiors: curved stairways, bath niches and ceiling cut-outs relate to the curves of the human body.

253_CI_060129_005_RENDER
253_CI_060129_005_RENDER
253_CP_0711_IB_721_5748_H
253_CP_0711_IB_721_5748_H
253_CP_0711_749_IB
253_CP_0711_749_IB
253_MO_0504_022_BATHROOM
253_MO_0504_022_BATHROOM
253_CP_060206_084
253_CP_060206_084

Three-dimensional grids developed from graffiti patterns allude to New York’s tradition of ornamentation.

253_RF_0408_001_SULLIVAN
253_RF_0408_001_SULLIVAN
253_RF_0612_004_TAGS
253_RF_0612_004_TAGS
253_RF_0612_005_PATTERN
253_RF_0612_005_PATTERN
253_MU_050923_Gate_Render
253_MU_050923_Gate_Render
253_MU_0511_034_FOAM
253_MU_0511_034_FOAM
253_MU_0503_050_FOAM
253_MU_0503_050_FOAM
253_MU_0506_026_TATE
253_MU_0506_026_TATE
253_MU_0511_006_TALLIX
253_MU_0511_006_TALLIX
253_MO_0501_042_Gate
253_MO_0501_042_Gate
253_CO_0704_528
253_CO_0704_528
253_MU_060112_301_Gate
253_MU_060112_301_Gate
253_CO_060809_056
253_CO_060809_056

Models of the ornamental patterns that are seen again in the lobby in metal, wood, and concrete.

253_MU_0506_013_INOX
253_MU_0506_013_INOX
253_MU_0512_001_INOX
253_MU_0512_001_INOX
253_MU_0512_004_INOX
253_MU_0512_004_INOX
253_MU_0506_023_INOX
253_MU_0506_023_INOX
253_CP_0711_741_IB
253_CP_0711_741_IB
253_CP_0711_746_IB
253_CP_0711_746_IB

The finished building makes a strong statement but also fits into the neighborhood.

253_CP_0711_735_IB
253_CP_0711_735_IB
253_CP_0711_705_IB
253_CP_0711_705_IB
253_CP_0711_IB_703_5097_H
253_CP_0711_IB_703_5097_H

Drawings

253_DR_1006_A101_LV0
253_DR_1006_A101_LV0
253_DR_1006_A102_LV2
253_DR_1006_A102_LV2
253_DR_1006_A103_LV3-6
253_DR_1006_A103_LV3-6
253_DR_1006_A104_LV7
253_DR_1006_A104_LV7
253_DR_100617_A302_S1
253_DR_100617_A302_S1
253_DR_1006_A500
253_DR_1006_A500
253_DT_100617_A401
253_DT_100617_A401
253_DT_100617_A420
253_DT_100617_A420
253_DT_100617_A424
253_DT_100617_A424
253_DT_100617_A430
253_DT_100617_A430
253_DT_100617_A434
253_DT_100617_A434

Team

Facts

Client
Ian Schrager Company, New York, USA
Planning
This project was developed in collaboration with an architect licensed in the state of New York acting as the "Architect of Record". Herzog & de Meuron is not licensed to practice architecture in New York State.
Architect Planning: Herzog & de Meuron, Basel, Switzerland
Partner Architect: Handel Architects LLP, New York, USA
General Planning: Handel Architects LLP, New York, USA
Construction Management: Bovis Lend Lease, New York, USA
Structural Engineer: Desimone Consulting Engineers, New York, USA
Mechanical Engineer: Ambrosino DePinto & Schmieder, New York, USA
Specialist / Consulting
Facade Consulting: Israel Berger & Associates, New York, USA; Dewhurst Macfarlane and Partners, New York, USA
Lighting Consulting: Johnson Light Studio, New York, USA
Building Data
Gross floor area (GFA): 83'215 sqft, 7'731 sqm
Number of levels: 10
Footprint: 8'697 sqft, 808 sqm
Length: 65 ft, 20 m
Width: 137 ft, 42 m
Height: 141 ft, 43 m

Bibliography

Gerhard Mack, Herzog & de Meuron: “Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2004. Das Gesamtwerk. Band 5.” Edited by: Gerhard Mack. Basel, Birkhäuser, 2020.
Also published in English: “Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2004. The Complete Works. Volume 5.” Birkhäuser, 2020.

Luis Fernández-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva Monografías. Herzog & de Meuron 2005-2013.” Vol. No. 157/158, Madrid, Arquitectura Viva SL, 09.2012.

Fernando Márquez Cecilia; Richard Levene (Eds.): “El Croquis. Herzog & de Meuron 2005-2010. Programme, Monument, Landscape. Programa, Monumento, Paisaje.” Vol. No. 152/153, Madrid, El Croquis, 2010.

Paul Kuitenbrouwer: “Herzog & de Meuron: 40 Bond, New York.” In: Eelco van Welie (Ed.). “DASH Delft Architectural Studies on Housing. The Luxury City Apartment. Het Luxe Stadsappartement.” Rotterdam, NAi, 2009. pp. 60-67

Herzog & de Meuron. “40 Bond, Apartment Building.” In: “Materia.” Vol. No. 58, Milan, Frederico Motta Editore, 06.2008. pp. 62-75.

Stefano Casciani: “Tags and the City.” In: “Domus. Contemporary Architecture, Interiors, Design, Art.” Vol. No. 910, Rozzano, Editoriale Domus S.p.A., 01.2008. pp. 92-99.

Luis Fernández-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva. Herzog & de Meuron 1978-2007.” 2nd rev. ed. Madrid, Arquitectura Viva, 2007.

Location