Herzog & de Meuron
Concept
2001-2003
Project
2004-2014
Realization
2006-2016

Between Hanseatic Hub and HafenCity

The Elbphilharmonie on the Kaispeicher marks a location that most people in Hamburg know about but have never really noticed. It is now set to become a new centre of social, cultural and daily life for the people of Hamburg and for visitors from all over the world.

Too often a new cultural centre appears to cater to the privileged few. In order to make the new Philharmonic a genuinely public attraction, it is imperative to provide not only attractive architecture but also an attractive mix of urban uses. The building complex accommodates a philharmonic hall, a chamber music hall, restaurants, bars, a panorama terrace with views of Hamburg and the harbour, apartments, a hotel and parking facilities. These varied uses are combined in one building as they are in a city. And like a city, the two contradictory and superimposed architectures of the Kaispeicher and the Philharmonic ensure exciting, varied spatial sequences: on the one hand, the original and archaic feel of the Kaispeicher marked by its relationship to the harbour; on the other, the sumptuous, elegant world of the Philharmonic. In between, there is an expansive topography of public and private spaces, all differing in character and scale: the large terrace of the Kaispeicher, extending like a new public plaza, responds to the inwardly oriented world of the Philharmonic built above it.

The heart of the complex is the Elbphilharmonie itself. A space has emerged that foregrounds music listeners and music makers to such an extent that, together, they actually represent the architecture. The philharmonic building typology has undergone architectural reformulation that is exceptionally radical in its unprecedented emphasis on the proximity between artist and audience – almost like a football stadium.

Urban Architecture for Lovers of Culture

The new philharmonic is not just a site for music; it is a full-fledged residential and cultural complex. The concert hall, seating 2100, and the chamber music hall for 550 listeners are embedded in between luxury flats and a five-star hotel with built-in services such as restaurants, a health and fitness centre, conference facilities. Long a mute monument of the post-war era that occasionally hosted fringe events, the Kaispeicher A has now been transformed into a vibrant, international centre for music lovers, a magnet for both tourists and the business world. The Elbphilharmonie will become a landmark of the city of Hamburg and a beacon for all of Germany. It will vitalize the neighbourhood of the burgeoning HafenCity, ensuring that it is not merely a satellite of the venerable Hanseatic city but a new urban district in its own right.

The Archaic Kaispeicher

The Kaispeicher A, designed by Werner Kallmorgen, was constructed between 1963 and 1966 and used as a warehouse until close to the end of the last century. Originally built to bear the weight of thousands of heavy bags of cocoa beans, it now lends its solid construction to supporting the new Philharmonic. The structural potential and strength of the old building has been enlisted to bear the weight of the new mass resting on top of it.

Our interest in the warehouse lies not only in its unexploited structural potential but also in its architecture. The robust, almost aloof building provides a surprisingly ideal foundation for the new philharmonic hall. It seems to be part of the landscape and is not yet really part of the city, which has now finally pushed forward to this location. The harbour warehouses of the 19th century were designed to echo the vocabulary of the city’s historical façades: their windows, foundations, gables and various decorative elements are all in keeping with the architectural style of the time. Seen from the River Elbe, they were meant to blend in with the city’s skyline despite the fact that they were uninhabited storehouses that neither required nor invited the presence of light, air and sun.

But not the Kaispeicher A: it is a heavy, massive brick building like many other warehouses in the Hamburg harbour, but its archaic façades are abstract and aloof. The building’s regular grid of holes measuring 50 x 75 cm cannot be called windows; they are more structure than opening.

The New Glass Building

The new building has been extruded from the shape of the Kaispeicher; it is identical in ground plan with the brick block of the older building, above which it rises. However, at the top and bottom, the new structure takes a different tack from the quiet, plain shape of the warehouse below: the undulating sweep of the roof rises from the lower eastern end to its full height of 108 metres at the Kaispitze (the tip of the peninsula). The Elbphilharmonie is a landmark visible from afar, lending an entirely new vertical accent to the horizontal layout that characterises the city of Hamburg. There is a greater sense of space here in this new urban location, generated by the expanse of the water and the industrial scale of the seagoing vessels.
The glass façade, consisting in part of curved panels, some of them carved open, transforms the new building, perched on top of the old one, into a gigantic, iridescent crystal, whose appearance keeps changing as it catches the reflections of the sky, the water and the city.

The bottom of the superstructure also has an expressive dynamic. Along its edges, the sky can be seen from the Plaza through vault-shaped openings, creating spectacular, theatrical views of both the River Elbe and downtown Hamburg. Further inside, deep vertical openings provide ever-changing visual relations between the Plaza and the foyers on different levels.

Entrance and Plaza

The main entrance to the Kaispeicher complex lies to the east. An exceptionally long escalator leads up to the Plaza; it describes a slight curve so that it cannot be seen in full from one end to the other. It is a spatial experience in itself; it cuts straight through the entire Kaispeicher, passing a large panorama window with a balcony that affords a view of the harbour before continuing on up to the Plaza. The latter, sitting on top of the Kaispeicher and under the new building, is like a gigantic hinge between old and new. It is a new public space that offers a unique panorama. Restaurants, bars, ticket office and hotel lobby are located here, as well as access to the foyers of the new philharmonic.

The Elbphilharmonie

What kind of a space will the philharmonic be? What acoustic and architectural concerns have gone into its construction? What tradition resonates in this hall in comparison to other new locations, say, in Tokyo and Los Angeles or the ur-model in Berlin. It soon became clear that the Hamburg Philharmonic would be different from that ur-model, the Scharoun Philharmonic. The premises alone – the radical givens of the location, namely the harbour and the existing warehouse – invite change. This is a project of the 21st century that would have been inconceivable before. What has been retained is the fundamental idea of the Philharmonic as a space where orchestra and conductor are located in the midst of the audience, as it were: here the architecture and the arrangement of the tiers take their cue from the logic of the acoustic and visual perception of music, performers and audience. But that logic leads to another conclusion. The tiers are more pervasive; tiers, walls and ceiling form a spatial unity. The people, that is the combination of audience and musicians, determine the space; the space seems to consist only of people. In this respect, it resembles the typology of the football stadium that we have developed in recent years, with the goal of allowing an almost interactive proximity between audience and players. We also studied archaic forms of theatre, like Shakespeare’s Globe, with a view to exploiting the vertical dimension. The complex geometry of the hall unites organic flow with incisive, near static shape. Walking, standing, sitting, seeing, being seen, listening
 all the activities and needs of people in a concert hall are explicitly expressed in the architecture of the space. This space, rising vertically almost like a tent, offers room for 2100 people to congregate for the enjoyment of making and listening to music. The towering shape of the hall defines the static structure of the entire volume of the building and is correspondingly echoed in the silhouette of the building as a whole.

Zwischen Hansestadt und Hafencity

Die Elbphilharmonie auf dem Kaispeicher prĂ€gt einen Ort in der Stadt, welcher bisher den meisten zwar irgendwie bekannt war, ohne dass sie ihn aber wirklich kannten. In Zukunft wird dieser Ort fĂŒr sĂ€mtliche Hamburger und fĂŒr Leute aus aller Welt zu einem neuen Zentrum des gesellschaftlichen, kulturellen und alltĂ€glichen Lebens.

Damit die neue Philharmonie wirklich zu einem öffentlichen Anziehungspunkt werden kann und nicht nur wenigen Privilegierten offen stehen wird, ist nicht nur eine attraktive Architektur, sondern auch ein attraktiver Mix aus urbanen Nutzungen erforderlich. Philharmonie, kleiner Musiksaal, Restaurant, Bars, Wohnungen, Hotel, eine Aussichtsterrasse mit Blick ĂŒber Hamburg und den Hafen sowie Parking. Das alles verdichtet sich in dem GebĂ€ude wie in einer Stadt. Ebenfalls wie in einer Stadt sorgen die beiden so kontrĂ€ren, ĂŒbereinander gestapelten Architekturen des Kaispeichers und der Philharmonie fĂŒr spannungsvolle und unterschiedliche rĂ€umliche Sequenzen. Hier die vom Hafen geprĂ€gte, ursprĂŒnglich und archaisch wirkende Architektur des Kaispeichers, dort die feierlich-elegante Welt der Philharmonie und dazwischen eine ganze Topografie von öffentlichen und privaten RĂ€umen unterschiedlicher AusprĂ€gung und MaßstĂ€blichkeit: Der in die Ferne gerichteten Dimension der grossen Terrasse, die sich wie ein neuer, öffentlicher Platz auf dem Kaispeicher ausdehnt, antwortet die nach innen orientierte Welt der darĂŒber gebauten Philharmonie.

Der Raum der Elbphilharmonie selbst ist das eigentliche Zentrum, das HerzstĂŒck sozusagen. Hier entstand ein Raum, der Musik und Mensch, also das Publikum und die Musiker derart in den Vordergrund rĂŒckt, dass sie gemeinsam die eigentliche Architektur darstellen. Es ist eine architektonische Neuformulierung der philharmonischen Bautypologie – radikaler als jeder bisherige Versuch, weil eine unmittelbare NĂ€he zwischen KĂŒnstlern und Publikum geschaffen wurde, beinahe wie in einem Fussballstadion.

Eine urbane Architektur fĂŒr viele Kulturinteressierte

Die neue Philharmonie ist aber nicht nur ein Haus fĂŒr die Musik, sondern ein ganzer Wohn- und Kulturkomplex: Eine Konzerthalle fĂŒr 2100 und ein Kammermusiksaal fĂŒr 550 Besucher. Die zwei SĂ€le sind umgeben von einem 5-Sterne-Hotel, zugehörigen Einrichtungen wie Restaurants, Wellness- und KonferenzrĂ€umen sowie Luxuswohnungen. Der Kaispeicher A war lange Zeit ein stummes Monument aus der Nachkriegszeit, hie und da bespielt durch Events der Off-Szene. Nun ist daraus ein international ausstrahlendes Zentrum fĂŒr Musikliebhaber geworden, aber auch ein Magnet fĂŒr Touristen und GeschĂ€ftsleute. Die neue Philharmonie wird zur Lebendigkeit der ganzen Nachbarschaft beitragen. Das heisst, es wird daraus ein Leuchtturm fĂŒr Deutschland und die Stadt Hamburg fĂŒr die neue, hier entstehende „Hafencity“. Die Elbphilharmonie wird dazu beitragen, dass das neue Quartier nicht nur ein Satellit der alten Hansastadt ist sondern ein vollwertiges Stadtquartier.

Der archaische Kaispeicher

Der Kaispeicher A, von Werner Kallmorgen entworfen und 1963 bis 1966 gebaut, wurde bis gegen Ende des letzten Jahrhunderts als Lagerhaus fĂŒr Kakaobohnen genutzt. Tausende von prall gefĂŒllten SĂ€cken lagerten in der entsprechend massiv dimensionierten Konstruktion. Dieses statische Potenzial setzen wir fĂŒr die neue Nutzung ein: Der Speicher trĂ€gt die Philharmonie. Die Lasten, die der Speicher frĂŒher in sich aufnahm, nimmt er jetzt auf sich.

Der Speicher interessiert uns aber nicht nur wegen seines brachliegenden statischen Potenzials, sondern auch als Architektur. Die trutzige, beinahe abweisende Architektur bildet die unerwartete und gerade deshalb so ideale Basis fĂŒr die neue Philharmonie. Er wirkt wie ein Teil der Landschaft und noch nicht wirklich wie ein Teil der Stadt, welche nun endlich an jenen Ort vorgedrungen ist. Die historischen, aus dem 19. Jahrhundert stammenden LagerhĂ€user der Speicherstadt bedienten sich noch eines stĂ€dtischen Fassaden-Vokabulars: Sie hatten Fenster, bildeten Sockel und Dachformen aus, und sie waren dekoriert wie Wohn- oder GeschĂ€ftshĂ€user andernorts. Man sollte von der Elbe aus eine Stadtvedute erkennen, auch wenn es alles LagerhĂ€user waren, unbelebte HĂ€user also, in denen weder Licht, Luft noch Sonne erwĂŒnscht war.

Nicht so der Kaispeicher A: Er ist zwar aus Backstein gebaut wie viele andere LagergebĂ€ude im Hamburger Hafen, schwer und massiv. Seine archaischen Fassaden aber sind abstrakt und abweisend. Fenster kann man die im Raster aufgesetzten, 50x75cm grossen Löcher nicht nennen, sie sind mehr Struktur als Öffnung.

Der glÀserne Neubau

Der Neubau wird aus der Form des Kaispeichers extrudiert, passgenau und mit identischer GrundflĂ€che auf den Backsteinblock des Kaispeichers aufgesetzt. Die Ober- und Unterseiten dieses aufgesetzten Baukörpers sind jedoch ganz anders als die ruhige, plastisch einfache Form des Speichers: in weiten SchwĂŒngen schwingt das Dach von der tiefer liegenden östlichen Seite bis hinauf an die Kaispitze mit 108m Gesamthöhe. Die Elbphilharmonie wird zur weithin sichtbaren Landmarke, die in der horizontal konzipierten Stadt Hamburg einen völlig neuen vertikalen Akzent setzt. Hier an diesem neuen Ort der Stadt ist der Raum weiter, durch die FlĂ€chen des Wassers und den industriellen Massstab der Schiffe geprĂ€gt.

Die in Bereichen aus gekrĂŒmmten und teilweise aufgeschnittenen Glaspanelen gefertigte Glasfassade verwandelt den aufgesetzten Baukörper der Philharmonie in einen riesigen Kristall mit immer wieder neuem Erscheinungsbild: er fĂ€ngt die Reflektionen des Himmels, des Wassers und der Stadt ein und fĂŒgt sie zu einem Vexierbild der Umgebung zusammen.

Auch die Unterseite des auf den Speicher aufgesetzten Neubaus ist bewegt. An den RĂ€ndern öffnen gewölbeartige Einschnitte den Blick von der Plaza in den Himmel und schaffen spektakulĂ€re, theatralische Prospekte ĂŒber die Elbe und die Hamburger Innenstadt. Im Innern öffnen sich tiefe Einschnitte nach oben, die Blickbeziehungen zwischen der Plaza und den verschiedenen Foyerebenen freigeben.

Eingang und Plaza

Der Haupteingang ist auf der Ostseite des Kaispeichers. Eine langgezogene Rolltreppe fĂŒhrt zur Plaza. Sie ist leicht gekrĂŒmmt, sodass vom Ausgangspunkt her der Endpunkt der Fahrt nicht erkennbar ist. So wird die Fahrt selbst zum rĂ€umlichen Erlebnis – durch den gesamten Kaispeicher hindurch, vorbei an einem grossen Aussichtsfenster mit Sichtbalkon ĂŒber dem Hafen, und von dort hinauf auf die Plaza. Diese liegt direkt auf dem Kaispeicher und unter dem Neubau, gleichsam als grosse Fuge zwischen den GebĂ€udeteilen. Sie ist ein neuer öffentlicher Raum mit einzigartigem Panorama. Restaurants, Bars, Ticketoffice und Hotellobby liegen alle an dieser Plaza, und von hier aus gelangt man auch in die Foyers der neuen Philharmonie.

Die Philharmonie

Was fĂŒr ein Raum wird die Philharmonie werden? Welche Überlegungen zur Akustik und zur Architektur stehen dahinter? In welcher Tradition steht dieser Saal, verglichen mit neueren SĂ€len in Tokyo, in Los Angeles und dem Ur-Modell in Berlin? Es wurde bald klar, dass die Hamburger Philharmonie etwas Anderes, Neues werden soll, das nicht vom Ur-Modell der Scharouner Philharmonie ausgeht. Sie wird auch etwas Neues, schon aufgrund der radikalen, örtlichen Voraussetzungen des Hafens und des vorhandenen Speicherbaus. Es ist ein Projekt des 21.Jahrhunderts, das so frĂŒher gar nicht denkbar war. Geblieben ist die Grundidee der Philharmonie als Raum, wo sich Orchester und Dirigent quasi mitten im Publikum befinden und die Architektur des Raums und die Anordnung der RĂ€nge sich aus der Logik von akustischer und visueller Wahrnehmung der Musik, der KĂŒnstler und des Publikums entwickelt. Aber diese Logik fĂŒhrt zu einem anderen Schluss. Die RĂ€nge reichen höher in den Gesamtraum hinein, RĂ€nge, WĂ€nde und Decke bilden eine rĂ€umliche Einheit. Die Menschen, d.h. Zuschauer und Musiker zusammen bestimmen den Raum. Der Raum scheint nur noch aus Menschen zu bestehen. Darin Ă€hnelt die Raumkonzeption jenem Typ Fussballstadion, welchen wir in den letzten Jahren entwickelten und der eine beinahe interaktive NĂ€he von Besucher und Spieler zum Ziel hatte. Auch archaische Theaterformen, wie das Shakespearesche Theater, haben wir angeschaut im Hinblick auf das Nutzbarmachen der vertikalen Dimension. Die komplexe Geometrie des Saals vereinigt organisch fliessende mit scharf geschnittenen, eher statischen Formen. Gehen, Stehen, Sitzen, Sehen, Gesehenwerden, Hören
 sĂ€mtliche AktivitĂ€ten und BedĂŒrfnisse des Menschen im Konzertsaal sind in der Architektur des Raums unmittelbar ausgedrĂŒckt. Dieser Raum ist vertikal aufragend, beinahe wie ein Zelt, in dem sich 2100 Menschen versammeln um Musik zu machen und Musik zu hören. Die aufragende Form des Saals war formgebende statische Struktur fĂŒr den gesamten Baukörper und zeichnet sich dementsprechend in der Silhouette des GebĂ€udes ab.

Herzog & de Meuron, 2016

230_CP_161030_0757_IB_H_3627
230_CP_161030_0757_IB_H_3627
230_CP_170128_1723_IB_H_5344
230_CP_170128_1723_IB_H_5344
230_CP_170128_0776_IB_H_2008_PRI
230_CP_170128_0776_IB_H_2008_PRI
230_CP_170128_1647_IB_H_5987
230_CP_170128_1647_IB_H_5987
230_CP_170128_1619_IB_H_4871
230_CP_170128_1619_IB_H_4871
230_CP_170128_1545_IB_H_4683
230_CP_170128_1545_IB_H_4683
230_CP_161101_0940_IB_H_6896
230_CP_161101_0940_IB_H_6896
230_CP_170128_1087_IB_H_2956
230_CP_170128_1087_IB_H_2956
230_CP_170128_1195_IB_H_3283-Pano
230_CP_170128_1195_IB_H_3283-Pano
230_CP_161031_1106_IB_H_5984
230_CP_161031_1106_IB_H_5984
230_CP_161101_0924_IB_H_6830
230_CP_161101_0924_IB_H_6830
230_CP_161101_0890_IB_H_6709
230_CP_161101_0890_IB_H_6709
230_CP_161031_0782_IB_H_4596
230_CP_161031_0782_IB_H_4596
230_CP_161031_0795_IB_H_4638
230_CP_161031_0795_IB_H_4638
230_CP_161104_009_IB
230_CP_161104_009_IB
230_CP_161030_0841_IB_H_3875
230_CP_161030_0841_IB_H_3875
230_CP_161031_0741_IB_H_4477
230_CP_161031_0741_IB_H_4477
230_CP_170128_1571_IB_H_4759
230_CP_170128_1571_IB_H_4759
230_CP_161030_0882_IB_H_4044
230_CP_161030_0882_IB_H_4044
230_CP_161031_0808_IB_H_4674
230_CP_161031_0808_IB_H_4674
230_CP_161031_0831_IB_H_4737
230_CP_161031_0831_IB_H_4737
230_CP_170128_1338_IB_H_3853
230_CP_170128_1338_IB_H_3853
230_CP_170128_1294_IB_H_3655
230_CP_170128_1294_IB_H_3655
230_CP_170128_0790_IB_H_2054
230_CP_170128_0790_IB_H_2054
230_CP_170128_0735_IB_H_1861
230_CP_170128_0735_IB_H_1861
230_CP_161101_0732_IB_H_6132
230_CP_161101_0732_IB_H_6132
230_CP_161104_014_IB
230_CP_161104_014_IB
230_CP_170128_1593_IB_H_4816
230_CP_170128_1593_IB_H_4816

Process

The old Kaiserspeicher, constructed in 1875, marked the entrance to the historic Speicherstadt, which is now a listed cultural heritage site. Following damage to its structure during World War II, the Kaiserspeicher was replaced in 1963 by a functional repository designed by Werner Kallmorgen.

230_SI_0606_076
230_SI_0606_076
230_SI_0606_075
230_SI_0606_075
230_SI_0606_072
230_SI_0606_072
230_SI_0000_001
230_SI_0000_001

The Elbphilharmonie references the prominent church spires in Hamburg’s Old Town.

230_CI_060322_130
230_CI_060322_130
230_DR_0304_005_STADT-ANSICHT
230_DR_0304_005_STADT-ANSICHT

The desired uses — hotel and concert hall — progress from two separate buildings into one coherent structure.

230_MO_0304_022
230_MO_0304_022
230_MO_0304_021
230_MO_0304_021
230_MO_0304_020
230_MO_0304_020
230_MO_0304_016
230_MO_0304_016
230_MO_0304_011
230_MO_0304_011
230_MO_0304_014
230_MO_0304_014
230_MO_0304_501
230_MO_0304_501

The path to the concert hall, via a long, curved escalator through the Kaispeicher, is staged as a “prelude,” with an intermediate landing where visitors have a magnificent view of the Elbe.

230_CI_0604_031_Rolltreppe
230_CI_0604_031_Rolltreppe
230_CI_0604_502
230_CI_0604_502
230_CI_0706_161_FOYER
230_CI_0706_161_FOYER
230_MO_0305_003_MO-001
230_MO_0305_003_MO-001
230_CI_0510_030_Galerie
230_CI_0510_030_Galerie
230_CI_0510_033_Galerie
230_CI_0510_033_Galerie

The roof of the Kaispeicher forms a new plaza, with the sculptural concert hall sweeping upwards from it and framing views of the city and the docks.

230_MO_0506_513
230_MO_0506_513
230_CI_0305_016
230_CI_0305_016
230_MO_0504_502
230_MO_0504_502
230_MO_0712_001_Plaza
230_MO_0712_001_Plaza
230_MO_0603_130
230_MO_0603_130

The client specifies that the main auditorium should provide an alternative to the conventional shoe-box concert hall, which Hamburg already has in the Laeiszhalle.

230_MO_1410_061-MOc
230_MO_1410_061-MOc
230_MO_0504_087-MOB
230_MO_0504_087-MOB
230_MO_1410_057-MOc
230_MO_1410_057-MOc
230_MO_1410_055-MOc
230_MO_1410_055-MOc
230_MO_0506_171_saal-konzept
230_MO_0506_171_saal-konzept
230_MO_0506_140_saal-konzept
230_MO_0506_140_saal-konzept
230_DR_0508_501_502_503_504_K
230_DR_0508_501_502_503_504_K
230_MO_0604_002
230_MO_0604_002
230_MO_0507_179_SAAL_K
230_MO_0507_179_SAAL_K
230_MO_0510_071_108-MOd
230_MO_0510_071_108-MOd

Balconies project forward into the space, bringing the audience and musicians closer together. Panels, individually milled for each location, line the hall with an acoustic crust in a contemporary translation of the stucco decorations in grand historic concert halls, giving the Elbphilharmonie auditorium a festive ambience.

230_MU_1202_165_PRODUKTION_K

230_MO_0605_397
230_MO_0605_397
230_MU_0809_511
230_MU_0809_511
230_MU_0809_516
230_MU_0809_516
230_CO_161106_801_PdM_K
230_CO_161106_801_PdM_K

The architects design the Elbphilharmonie as a brick plinth beneath a glass body that reacts to the water and the sky.

230_MO_0511_093_STUDIE
230_MO_0511_093_STUDIE
230_MO_1410_300-MOa
230_MO_1410_300-MOa
230_MO_1410_222-MOa
230_MO_1410_222-MOa
230_MO_1410_290-MOa
230_MO_1410_290-MOa
230_MO_1410_149-MOa
230_MO_1410_149-MOa

The finish of the facade emphasizes glass as a material. Having first experimented with a faceted facade, the architects devise an undulating glass skin. Biomorphic openings for loggias and shallow protrusions accommodating small ventilation windows bring movement into a rectangular grid of coated glass panels printed with myriad dots.

230_DT_0000_HB1A-A_K
230_DT_0000_HB1A-A_K
230_CO_1010_001_K
230_CO_1010_001_K
230_MU_0803_132_Mod
230_MU_0803_132_Mod
230_DR_090821_190_K
230_DR_090821_190_K
230_DR_090821_175_K
230_DR_090821_175_K
230_DR_0808_013
230_DR_0808_013

With its tent-like shape, the roof is designed as a fifth facade, parts of which can also be seen from below: “sequins” in two sizes are laid over insulation and a membrane, optimally covering the concave surfaces and infrastructure elements such as ventilation.

230_MO_0605_059
230_MO_0605_059
230_CO_150625_3861_DACH_K
230_CO_150625_3861_DACH_K
230_CP_161030_919_IB_K
230_CP_161030_919_IB_K
230_DR_0000_ARC-5-7656_K_1
230_DR_0000_ARC-5-7656_K_1

Constructing the Elbphilharmonie: the foundations of the gutted Kaispeicher are reinforced to support the 200,000-ton new build.

230_CO_0907_004_LuftEntkern
230_CO_0907_004_LuftEntkern
230_CO_0709_140
230_CO_0709_140
230_CO_100526_395_OH
230_CO_100526_395_OH
230_CO_1105_703_FFR
230_CO_1105_703_FFR
230_CO_091211_308_Rolltreppe
230_CO_091211_308_Rolltreppe
230_CO_110306_794_IB
230_CO_110306_794_IB
230_CO_100526_410_OH
230_CO_100526_410_OH
230_CO_100818_507_6266
230_CO_100818_507_6266
230_CO_091211_275_Treppe-KS
230_CO_091211_275_Treppe-KS
230_CO_091211_276_Plaza
230_CO_091211_276_Plaza
230_CO_140912_339_REFLEKTOR_K
230_CO_140912_339_REFLEKTOR_K
230_CO_1408_Dach_0773
230_CO_1408_Dach_0773

230_CO_0706_082

230_AV_120601_walkthrough_test

230_CO_100526_403_OH
230_CO_100526_403_OH

230_VD_131003_MUSIC_16X9

Moving through the finished building: coming in from outside and progressing upwards into the Elbphilharmonie main hall with the organ.

230_CP_161030_0716_IB
230_CP_161030_0716_IB
230_CP_161101_0917_IB
230_CP_161101_0917_IB
230_CP_170128_925_IB
230_CP_170128_925_IB
230_CP_1610_703_IB
230_CP_1610_703_IB
230_CP_161104_009_IB
230_CP_161104_009_IB
230_CP_1701_017_IB
230_CP_1701_017_IB
230_CP_1701_004_IB
230_CP_1701_004_IB
230_CP_1701_000_IB
230_CP_1701_000_IB

Drawings

230_DR_0508_501_502_503_504_K
230_DR_0508_501_502_503_504_K
230_DR_0304_005_STADT-ANSICHT
230_DR_0304_005_STADT-ANSICHT
230_DR_160926_LU2_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_LU2_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_LU1_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_LU1_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L00_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L00_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L02_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L02_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L03_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L03_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L04_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L04_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L05_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L05_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L06_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L06_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L07_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L07_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L08_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L08_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L09_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L09_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L10_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L10_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L11_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L11_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L12_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L12_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L13_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L13_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L14_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L14_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L15_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L15_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L16_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L16_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L17_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L17_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L18_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L18_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L19_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L19_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L20_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L20_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L21_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L21_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L22_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L22_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L23_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L23_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L24_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L24_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L25_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L25_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L26_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_L26_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_LR_ENG_500
230_DR_160926_LR_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S1_V1_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S1_V1_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S1_V2_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S1_V2_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S2_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S2_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S3_ENG_500
230_DR_160606_S3_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELN_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELN_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELE_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELE_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELS_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELS_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELW_ENG_500
230_DR_160923_ELW_ENG_500
230_DR_090821_190_K
230_DR_090821_190_K
230_DR_090821_175_K
230_DR_090821_175_K
230_DT_0000_HB1A-A_K
230_DT_0000_HB1A-A_K
230_DT_5502_GS-Balkon-System-schnitt
230_DT_5502_GS-Balkon-System-schnitt

Team

Partners
Jacques Herzog
Pierre de Meuron
Ascan Mergenthaler (Partner in Charge 2005-2016)
David Koch (Partner in Charge Project Management 2008-2015)
Robert Hösl (2004-2005)
Christine Binswanger (Partner in Charge 2003)
Project Team
Jan-Christoph Lindert (Associate, Project Director)
Christian Riemenschneider (Associate, Project Manager)
Nicholas Lyons (Associate, Project Architect)
Stefan Goeddertz (Associate, Project Architect)
Carsten Happel (Associate, Project Manager)
Stephan Wedrich (Associate, Project Director until 2012)
Henning Severmann (Project Manager)
Birgit Föllmer (Project Manager Main Hall)
Peter Scherz (Project Manager Granary and Kaistudio)
Kai Zang (Project Manager Detailing New Building and Chamber Music Hall)
Jan Per Grosch (Project Manager Envelope)
Christiane Anding
Thomas Arnhardt
Petra Arnold
Christian Baumgarten
Tobias Becker
Johannes Beinhauer
Uta Beissert
Lina Mareike Belling
Andreas Benischke
Inga Benkendorf
Johannes Bregel
Francesco Brenta
Jehann Brunk
Julia Katrin Buse
Ignacio Cabezas
Jean-Claude Cadalbert
Maria Christou
Sergio Cobos Álvarez
Massimo Corradi (Digital Technologies)
Guillaume Delemazure
Annika Delorette
Fabian Dieterle
Annette Donat
Philipp Dimitris Doukakis
Patrick Ehrhardt
Carmen Eichenberger
Stephanie Eickelmann
Magdalena Agata Falska
Daniel FernĂĄndez Florez
Stephan Flore
Hans Focketyn
Bernhard Forthaus
Andreas Fries
Asko Fromm
Florian Gast
Catherine Gay Menzel
Marco Gelsomini
Ulrich Grenz
Jana Grundmann
Hendrik Gruss
Luis GuzmĂĄn Grossberger
Christian Hahn
Yvonne Hahn
Naghmeh Hajibeik
David Hammer
Michael Hansmeyer
Nikolai Happ
Bernd Heidlindemann
Anne-Kathrin Hellermann
Magdalena Hellmann
Lars Höffgen
Philip Hogrebe
Ulrike Horn
Inga van Husen
Michael Iking
Ina Jansen
Nils Jarre
Damun Jawanrudi
JĂŒrgen Johner (Associate)
Leweni Kalentzi
Andreas Kimmel
Anja Klein
Frank Klimek
Alexander Kolbinger
Benjamin Koren
Tomas Kraus
Jonas Kreis
Nicole Lambrich
Jana Lasorik
Matthias Lehmann
Monika Lietz
Florian Gast
Hendrik Gruss
Luis GuzmĂĄn Grossberger
Naghmeh Hajibeik
David Hammer
Michael Hansmeyer
Anne-Kathrin Hellermann
Magdalena Hellmann
Philip Hogrebe
Anja Klein
Michael Iking
Ina Jansen
Nils Jarre
Andreas Kimmel
Damun Jawanrudi
Julia Kniess
Alexander Kolbinger
Benjamin Koren
Jonas Kreis
Jana Lasorik
Monika Lietz
Julian Löffler
Philipp Loeper
Thomas Lorenz
Florian Loweg
Xiaojing Lu
Femke LĂŒbcke
Tim LĂŒdtke
Lilian Lyons
Monika Lietz
Philipp Loeper
Florian Loweg
Thomas Lorenz
Xiaojing Lu
Femke LĂŒbcke
Tim LĂŒdtke
Lilian Lyons
Jan Maasjosthusmann
Janos Magyar
Klaus Marten
Petrina Meier
Götz Menzel
Alexander Meyer
Simone Meyer
Henning Michelsen
Alexander Montero Herberth
Philipp Loeper
Julian Löffler
Thomas Lorenz
Christina Loweg
Florian Loweg
Xiaojing Lu
Femke LĂŒbcke
Tim LĂŒdtke
Lilian Lyons
Jan Maasjosthusmann
Janos Magyar
Klaus Marten
Petrina Meier
Götz Menzel
Simone Meyer
Alexander Meyer
Henning Michelsen
Alexander Montero Herberth
Felix Morczinek
Jana MĂŒnsterteicher
Christiane Netz
Andreas Niessen
Monika Niggemeyer
MĂČnica Ors Romagosa
Argel Padilla Figueroa
Benedikt Pedde
Sebastian Pellatz
Malte Petersen
Jorge Picas
Philipp Poppe
Alrun Porkert
Yanbin Qian
Robin Quaas
Julian Raffetseder
Holger Rasch (Digital Technologies)
Leila Reese
Constance von RĂšge
Chantal Reichenbach
Leonard Reichert
Thorge Reinke
Ina Riemann
Nina Rittmeier
Dimitra Riza
Miguel RodrĂ­guez MartĂ­nez
Guido Roth
Christoph Röttinger
Patrick Sandner
Philipp Schaerer (Digital Technologies)
Chasper Schmidlin
Alexandra Schmitz
Martin Schneider
Leo Schneidewind
Malte Schoemaker
Katharina Schommer
Helene SchĂŒler
Katrin Schwarz
Gerrit Christopher Sell
Heeri Song
Nadine Stecklina
Markus Stern
Sebastian Stich
Sophie Stöbe
Stephanie Stratmann
Kai Strehlke (Digital Technologies)
Ulf Sturm
Stefano Tagliacarne
Anke Thestorf
Henning Többen
Kerstin Treiber
Florian Tschacher
Chih-Bin Tseng
Jan Ulbricht
Florian Voigt
Jonathan Volk
Maximilian Vomhof
Christof Weber
Ruth Maria Weber
Catharina Weis
Philipp Wetzel
Douwe Wieërs
Julius Wienholt
Julia Wildfeuer
Boris Wolf
Patrick Yong
Xiang Zhou
Bettina Zimmermann
Marco ZĂŒrn
Inga van Husen
Constance von RĂšge

Facts

Client
Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg, Germany
Planning
General Designer (2005-2013): ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie, Hamburg, Germany [Herzog & de Meuron AG, Hohler+ Partner Architekten und Ingenieure]
General Designer (2013-2016): Joint Venture Arbeitsgemeinschaft Planung Elbphilharmonie [Herzog & de Meuron GmbH, H+P Planungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, Hochtief Solutions AG]
Structural Engineering Concept & Design: Schnetzer Puskas International AG, Heinrich Schnetzer
Structural Engineering Planning: Schnetzer Puskas International AG with subcontractor: Rohwer Ingenieure
Structural Engineering Construction Documentation: Hochtief Solutions AG with subcontractor: Spannverbund Bausysteme GmbH (Contractor proposals Building Roof, Execution Building Roof, Main Hall - steel roof structure, internal roof steelwork including acoustic reflector)
Structural Engineering Certification: WK Consult, DR.-Ing Rainer Grzeschkowitz
Structural Engineering Brick Facade: JĂ€ger Ingenieure
Dynamic Calculations Main Hall: Schnetzer Puskas International AG
HVAC Engineering, Mechanical, Plumbing (2013-2016): Hochtief Solutions AGM Knott & Partner Ingenieure VDI, MĂŒller + Partner, C.A.T.S Computer and Technology Service GmbH
HVAC Engineering, Mechanical, Plumbing (2005-2013): ARGE Generarplaner Elbphilharmonie [Winter Ingenieure, General Contractor: Adamanta - Hochtief Solutions]
Electrical Engineering (2005-2013): Hochtief Solutions AG, ARGE Generarplaner Elbphilharmonie [Winter Ingenieure, General Contractor: Adamanta - Hochtief Solutions]
Electrical Engineering (2013-2016): Hochtief Solutions AG
Signage Planning (2005-2013): ARGE Generarplaner Elbphilharmonie
Signage Consulting (2005-2013): Ruedi Baur
Signage (2013-2016): Herzog & de Meuron GmbH with Integral Ruedi Baur
Signage (2013-2016): Hochtief Solutions AG
Sprinkler: Itega GmbH IngenieurbĂŒro, Hochtief Solutions AG
3D Modeling: Herzog & de Meuron GmbH, Hochtief Vicon
Specialist / Consulting
Acoustic Consulting: Nagata Acoustics Inc.
Building Physics (2005-2013): Taubert und Ruhe GmbH, JĂ€ger Ingenieure, TU Dresden, GWT, ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie, General Contractor Adamanta - Hochtief Consult
Building Physics (2013-2016): MF Dr. Flohrer Beratende Ingenieure GmbH, Hochtief Solutions AG
Crowd Flow: Happold IngenieurbĂŒro GmbH, Arbeitsgemeinschaft Planung Elbphilharmonie
Fire Safety Planning (2005-2013): HHP Nord/Ost Beratende Ingenieure GmbH,Hahn Consult Ingenieurgesellschaft, ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie, General Contractor: Adamanta
Fire Protection, Site Supervision (2013-2016): Hahn Consult Ingenieurgesellschaft
Noise Control: Taubert und Ruhe GmbH
Facade Engineering: R & R Fuchs
Facade Maintenance Strategy: Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Manfred Helmus Ingenieurpartnerschaft
Restoration Brick Facade: JĂ€ger Ingenieure GmbH, TU Dresden
SAA Consulting - Audio/Video: Peutz Consult GmbH, ADA Ahnert Design Acoustic
Climate Consulting (2005-2013): Transsolar
Thermal Simulation (Main Concert Hall): IngenieurbĂŒro Hauslade, GmbH in cooperation with Prof. Bjarne W. Olesen, Technical University of Denmark
Wind Engineering: Wacker Ingenieure
Scenography Consulting: ARGE Planung Elbphilharmonie, BAA Projektmanagement GmbH, Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie, Ducks Sceno, General Contractor: Adamanta, GCA Ingenieure
Traffic Planning (2005-2013): ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie, Ing.-Ges.mbH Heinmann
Transport Planning (2005-2013): ReGe Hamburg - ARGUS Stadt- und Verkehrsplanung
Vertical Circulation Consulting (2005-2013): Jappsen Ingenieure
Vertical Circulation Planning (2005-2013): ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie
Well Drilling Consulting (2005-2013): IGB Ingenieurgesellschaft, Hamburg, Germany
Well Drilling Planning (2005-2013): ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie
Contractors
General Contractor: Adamanta GrundstĂŒtcks-Vermietungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. Objekt, Elbphilharmonie KG represented by Hochtief Solutions AG
Facility Management: SPIE GmbH
Investor Consortium: Adamanta GrundstĂŒcks-Vermietungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. Objekt, Elbphilharmonie KG represented by HCommerz Real AG
Lightning Design and Planning: ARGE Planung Elbphilharmonie, ARGE Generalplaner Elbphilharmonie
Lightning (Collaboration) (2005-2012): Ulrike Brandi Licht
Building Data
Site Area: 113'451 sqft, 10'540 sqm
Gross floor area (GFA): 1'350'998 sqft, 125'512 sqm
Number of levels: 29
Footprint: 61'838 sqft, 5'745 sqm
Length: 413 ft, 126 m
Width: 288 ft, 88 m
Height: 360 ft, 110 m
Gross volume (GV): 16'805'276 cbft, 475'872 cbm
Facade surface: 242'187 sqft, 22'500 sqm
Links
www.elbphilharmonie.de

Bibliography

Gerhard Mack, Herzog & de Meuron: “Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2004. The Complete Works. Volume 5.” BirkhĂ€user, 2020.

Luis FernĂĄndez-Galiano (Ed.): “Herzog & de Meuron 2003-2019. (Vol.2),” Madrid, Arquitectura Viva SL, 12.2019.

Nobuyuki Yoshida, Herzog & de Meuron (Eds.): “Architecture and Urbanism. Herzog & de Meuron. Elbphilharmonie.” Vol. No. 558, Tokyo, A+U Publishing Co., Ltd., 03.2017.

Luis FernĂĄndez-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva Monografias. Herzog & de Meuron 2013-2017.” Vol. No. 191-192, Madrid, Arquitectura Viva SL, 12.2016.

Peter Sealy: “Elbphilharmonie Hamburg.” In: Vera Grimmer (Eds.) et al. “Oris. Magazine for Architecture and Culture.” Vol. No. 83, Zagreb, Arhitekst, 2013. pp. 12-29.

Georg KĂŒffner: “Der lange Weg zum perfekten Klang. Die Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg. Ein Bauwerk voller Herausforderungen.” In: Bundesingenieurkammer (Ed.). Ingenieurbaukunst. Made in Germany 2010/2011. Hamburg, Junius GmbH, 2010. pp. 40-51.

Fernando MĂĄrquez Cecilia; Richard Levene (Eds.): “El Croquis. Herzog & de Meuron 2005-2010. Programme, Monument, Landscape. Programa, Monumento, Paisaje.” Vol. No. 152/153, Madrid, El Croquis, 2010.

“Ein Kristall im Hafen. A Crystal in the Harbour. Die Glasfassade der Elbphilharmonie. The Glass Facade of the Elbphilharmonie.” In: Christian Schittich (Ed.). Detail. Zeitschrift fĂŒr Architektur und Baudetail. Review of Architecture. Analog und Digital. Analogue and Digital. Vol. No. 5, Munich, Institut fĂŒr internationale Architektur-Dokumentation GmbH & Co., 05.2010. pp. 498-509.

Luis FernĂĄndez-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva. Herzog & de Meuron 1978-2007.” 2nd rev. ed. Madrid, Arquitectura Viva, 2007.

Nobuyuki Yoshida (Ed.): “Architecture and Urbanism. Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2006.” Tokyo, A+U Publishing Co., Ltd., 08.2006.

Fernando MĂĄrquez Cecilia, Richard Levene (Eds.): “El Croquis. Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2006. Monumento e Intimidad. The Monumental and the Intimate.” Vol. No. 129/130, Madrid, El Croquis, 2006.

Location