Herzog & de Meuron
Competition
1993 (urban design competition of the university campus)
Project
1998-1999, 2001
Realization
2001-2004

The Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus (BTU) was newly founded in 1991 following the reunification of Germany. Erected on the former location of the University of Civil Engineering and other institutes, its buildings are constructed in a uniform style. They are all of essentially the same shape, height and material. In the early nineties, a competition called for proposals for the modernization and ongoing development of the new BTU.

In our proposal for the competition, we suggested placing two rectangular buildings on the area to the west of the university campus to house the library and the main lecture building. Those parts of the university that are also used by the population of Cottbus would become part of the city. But when the project was taken up again, the main auditorium had already been housed elsewhere within the campus. We came to the conclusion that the library required a different type of building; it would be a solitaire landmark within the surrounding urban architecture that would communicate the new spirit of the university and relate to the enviroment in many different ways.

The amoeba-like ground plan seems to spread and flow into the surrounding landscape. But is it a purely accidental shape as the result of spontaneous artistic inspiration and an expression of the architects’ personal feelings? Although indeed appearing, at first sight, to be a purely accidental shape, it proves on closer inspection to be a purposeful configuration of many different flows of movement. We made models to work out the sequences of movement and to test their quality, specifically their ability to reorganize and restructure urban space.

The glazed library building stands invitingly opposite the main entrance to the campus. From this vantage point, the library appears as an impressive body anchored in the park. When one approaches the building from downtown or from the north, it looks entirely different – more slender, almost like a free-standing tower. In fact, the building looks different from every avenue of approach and yet it remains a single continuous form, a flowing whole. Although it seems to be organic and explicitly self-referential, its design also derives from the express intention of lending the site a new and distinctive topographic quality within its urban context.

This philosophy characterizes the interior of the building as well. Its shape allows the creation of reading rooms in many different sizes and oriented in all different directions but within the larger whole of the library as a single, connected interior space, a spatial continuum. Following an orthogonal layout, the stories are cut back so that each has a different shape, generating an appealing tension between the stories and the continuous shell of the building.

Being able to leave out certain areas of the floor space on each level or in each part of the building gave us considerable freedom in designing the spatial sequences within the building. Some of the reading rooms are two or three stories high and have an extremely spacious feel; others are more intimate with intentionally low ceilings. While some of the rooms take full advantage of daylight illumination from the side or from above by following the curved, glazed shell of the building, other working spaces are somewhat screened off by being arranged along galleries. The flat, darker one-storey areas are essentially like stacks that house the shelves of the open access library.

An expansive spiral staircase, six meters in diameter, cuts through the entire structure and links all the stories. As a free-standing, sculptural object it provides orientation within the building. The stairs are so spacious that they not only ensure immediate access to all of the floors for people in a hurry but also offer room for others to stop and chat for a moment.

The color scheme in the reading rooms, with their atmosphere of quiet concentration, is grey and white. The architectural issues are space, light and a view. The areas in the interior of the building, where books and other media are stored, are bathed in color. The colors of the spectrum have been painted in stripes on the floors, supports and walls, following a rational, orthogonal system. They also assist orientation but without a defining color code for fields of study in the building. The colors are reflected in the metal ceilings and shelves to almost psychedelic effect.

A white veil is printed on both sides of the building’s glazed shell. Texts in different languages and alphabets have been superimposed in so many layers that they are no longer legible, but a pattern results whose origin in the world of written signs is unmistakable. The printed pattern breaks the reflection, eliminates the hardness of the glass and makes the body of the building homogeneous.

© Herzog & de Meuron, 2005

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Process

The context is defined by the coloring of the TV test pattern, the pine forests, the landscaped gardens of Prince Pückler-Muskau, historic reading rooms, and the former technical college.

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The library is to be part of a reorganization of the existing campus where the new Brandenburg University of Technology was founded in 1991.

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The competition design presents two rectangular buildings flanking a plaza.

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The library built several years later is a single structure whose shape is based on four circles.

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The new biomorphic shape allows a flexible, open plan layout on every level. The flooring in the shelved zones features a north-south sequence of colors based on the TV test pattern.

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The raw feel of the ferroconcrete is retained in the finished ten-story building; glass panels imprinted with highly pixelated lettering clad the building like a veil.

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The library, which looks different from every angle, creates a visual link between the campus and the town.

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Open spaces, several stories high, alternate with densely packed shelving and quiet reading areas. The distinctive spiral stairway is both focal point and meeting place, its form echoed in the lighting.

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Drawings

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Team

Facts

Client
Liegenschafts - und Bauamt Cottbus, Cottbus, Germany
Planning
General Planning : Joint Venture ARGE IKMZ Cottbus: Herzog & de Meuron, Basel, Switzerland / Höhler + Partner Architekten und Ingenieure, Aachen, Germany
Lead Design Architect: Herzog & de Meuron, Basel, Switzerland
Construction: Höhler + Partner Architekten und Ingenieure, Aachen, Germany
Structural Engineering: Pahn Ingenieure GmbH, Gross-Gaglow, Germany
Mechanical Engineering: IKL + Partner, Leipzig und Prof. Hänel, Cottbus, Germany
Electrical Engineering: Kügler + Wallstein, Cottbus, Germany
Landscape Design: Gisela Altmann, Cottbus, Germany
Specialist / Consulting
Facade Consulting: AMP Albrecht Memmert + Partner, Neuss, Germany
Fire Protection: Prof. E. Achilles, Frankfurt, Germany
Fire Protection: Jürgen Endress, Frankfurt, Germany
Acoustics: GWJ Ingenieurgesellschaft für Bauphysik, Cottbus, Germany
Building Data
Gross floor area (GFA): 136'346 sqft, 12'667 sqm
Footprint: 16'145 sqft, 1'500 sqm
Gross volume (GV): 2'060'365 cbft, 58'343 cbm

Bibliography

Gerhard Mack, Herzog & de Meuron: “Herzog & de Meuron 1997-2001. The Complete Works. Volume 4.” Edited by: Gerhard Mack. Basel / Boston / Berlin, Birkhäuser, 2008. Vol. No. 4.

Christian Gänshirt: “Neu Bau Land. 1990-2007. Architektur und Stadtumbau in den neuen Bundesländern. Architecture and Urban Restructuring in Former East Germany. IKZM der Brandenburgischen Technischen Universität Cottbus.” Edited by: Ernst A. Busche, Oliver G. Hamm, Peter Cachola Schmal. Exh. Cat. “Neu Bau Land. Architektur und Stadtumbau in den neuen Bundesländern.” Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt a.M. 23 June – 26 August 2007. Leipzig, E. A. Seemann, 2007. pp. 98-101.

Nobuyuki Yoshida (Ed.): “Architecture and Urbanism. Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2006.” Tokyo, A+U Publishing Co., Ltd., 08.2006.

Fernando Márquez Cecilia, Richard Levene (Eds.): “El Croquis. Herzog & de Meuron 2002-2006. Monumento e Intimidad. The Monumental and the Intimate.” Vol. No. 129/130, Madrid, El Croquis, 2006.

Luis Fernández-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva Monografías. Herzog & de Meuron 2000-2005.” Vol. No. 114, Madrid, Arquitectura Viva, 07.2005.

Herzog & de Meuron: “IKMZ Cottbus.” In: Ministerium der Finanzen des Landes Brandenburg (Ed.). “IKMZ. Informations-, Kommunikations- & Medienzentrum der BTU Cottbus.” Brandenburg, Self-Publishing Ministerium der Finanzen des Landes Brandenburg, 2005. pp. 17-21.

Fernando Márquez Cecilia, Richard Levene (Eds.): “El Croquis. Herzog & de Meuron 1998-2002. La Naturaleza del Artificio. The Nature of Artifice.” Vol. No. 109/110, Madrid, El Croquis, 2002.

Nobuyuki Yoshida (Ed.): “Architecture and Urbanism. Herzog & de Meuron 1978-2002.” Tokyo, A+U Publishing Co. Ltd., 02.2002.

Herzog & de Meuron. Natural History.” Edited by: Philip Ursprung. Exh. Cat. “Herzog & de Meuron. Archaeology of the Mind.” Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. 23 October 2002 – 6 April 2003. 2nd ed. Baden, Lars Müller, 2005.

Herzog & de Meuron. Naturgeschichte.” Edited by: Philip Ursprung. Exh. Cat. “Herzog & de Meuron. Archaeology of the Mind.” Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. 23 October 2002 – 6 April 2003. 2nd ed. Baden, Lars Müller, 2005.

Herzog & de Meuron. Histoire Naturelle.” Edited by: Philip Ursprung. Exh. Cat. Herzog & de Meuron. Archaeology of the Mind. Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. 23 October 2002 – 6 April 2003. Baden, Lars Müller, 2002.

Location