Herzog & de Meuron
Competition
1994-1995
Project
1995-1997
Realization
1998-2000
126_CP_005_701_MS
126_CP_005_701_MS
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126_CP_005_718_MS
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126_CP_0002_706_MS_b
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126_CP_0005_700_MS
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126_CP_0005_735_MS

Process

The route study of the competition shows the extent to which Herzog & de Meuron planned for a variety of spaces and routes from the very beginning.

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126_DR_0008_509_section
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126_SK_0008_500

Longitudinal section of the former boiler house with the exhibition floors in the model. Exhibition space with light strips following Zaugg’s studio in the model. The studio spaces of Rémy Zaugg as prototype for the lighting of the Tate. Cross section of the third exhibition floor with skylight strips. Exhibition space of Goetz Gallery with lateral light strips as prototype.

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126_MO_0008_500
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126_MO_0008_007M
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126_RF_0008_505_zaugg
126_DR_0008_510_crossection
126_DR_0008_510_crossection
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056_CP_9411_750_MS

Lively punctuation of the façade towards the Thames with additional windows and wall strips in various colors in an early version. Reduction of the mass of the façade through long window elements on the first floor. Special design of the parts to the right and left of the chimney with vertical windows in dark stone, referring to the original window strips in the façade. Recollection of the existing façade with partial closing of the window openings.

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126_DR_0008_552_elevation
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126_DR_0008_551_elevation

The façades facing the turbine hall show the activities in the galleries and balconies in all versions. Black brick façade with glass strips for each floor. Version of black brick and glass. Inscription and application of images on the façade. An early version with window openings of a modular type.

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126_DR_0008_505_section
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126_DR_0008_508_section

The former power plant is situated on the south bank of the Thames. Site plan (of the competition) with the layering of the parks by Kienast Vogt. The former riverside power plant is a counterpoint to St. Paul’s Cathedral. The power plant was isolated in the city despite its central location. The old power plant with smoking chimney. The chimney with collapsed façade and hollow interior.

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126_DR_0008_500
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126_DR_0008_561_site
Skyscan_A11271_006-HiRes
Skyscan_A11271_006-HiRes
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126_SI_0007_502_site
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126_RFsb_010403_original-statusa02
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126_CO_0004_001_framing_MLE

View of the old power plant from the opposite side of the Thames. Structure of the steel framework for the glazed light beam. The hollow interior of the power plant. Mounting of the glass façade of the two-story light beam. The machines in the old turbine hall had to be removed. Herzog & de Meuron had the interior dug out down to the ground.

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126_SI_9807_502
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126_CO_0007_500
126_CO_0008_500
126_CO_0008_500
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126_RFsb_010403_MLE
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126_CO_0004_002_hall1

The former turbine hall with its cathedral-like windows is a large urban space, a meeting place, an independent small town; a ramp leads down to it.

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126_31_9730-a_50x70_MS

Lit glass volumes with windows float like clouds of light into the turbine hall, which is separated by a central bridge.

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126_CP_0005_718_MS

The north entrance leads into the building like a floodgate. The stairs are designed as independent sculptural elements.

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126_CP_0005_706_MS
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126_CP_0005_735_MS

The exhibition space reaching across two levels makes the dimensions of the building tangible with its window slits.

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126_CP_0005_739_MS

Exhibition space at the head end with lateral skylight strips, the way they were first developed for Goetz Gallery in Munich.

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126_CP_0005_738_MS

Drawings

126_DR_0209_500_LEV1
126_DR_0209_500_LEV1
126_DR_020901_501_LEV2
126_DR_020901_501_LEV2
126_DR_020901_502_LEV3
126_DR_020901_502_LEV3
126_DR_020901_504_LEV5
126_DR_020901_504_LEV5
126_DR_020901_506_LEV7
126_DR_020901_506_LEV7

Team

Facts

Client
Tate Gallery, London, UK
Planning
Associate Architect: Sheppard Robson + Partners, London, UK
Construction Management: Schal International Management Ltd., London, UK
Structural Engineering: OAP - Ove Arup Partner, London, UK
HVAC Engineering: Arup Services, London, UK
Plumbing Engineering: Arup Services, London, UK
Electrical Engineering: Arup Services, London, UK
Landscape Design: Herzog & de Meuron in collaboration with Kienast Vogt+Partner, Zurich, Switzerland
Interior Design: Herzog & de Meuron in collaboration with Office for design, Lumsden
Specialist / Consulting
Facade Consulting: Emmer Pfennniger, Switzerland
Acoustics Consulting: OAP - Ove Arup Partner, London, UK
Lighting Consulting: OAP - Ove Arup Partner, London, UK
Fit Out Manager: OAP - Ove Arup Partner, London, UK
Building Data
Gross floor area (GFA): 365'972 sqft, 34'000 sqm
Links
www.tate.org.uk

Bibliography

Gerhard Mack, Herzog & de Meuron: “Herzog & de Meuron 1992-1996. The Complete Works. Volume 3.” Edited by: Gerhard Mack. Chinese ed. Beijing, China Architecture & Building Press, 2010. Vol. No. 3.

Sheena Wagstaff: “Tate Modern.” In: Nobuyuki Yoshida (Ed.). “Architecture and Urbanism.” Vol. No. 451, Tokyo, Architecture and Urbanism, 04.2008. pp. 128-135.

Luis Fernández-Galiano (Ed.): “Arquitectura Viva. Herzog & de Meuron 1978-2007.” 2nd rev. ed. Madrid, Arquitectura Viva, 2007.

Fernando Márquez Cecilia, Richard Levene (Eds.): “El Croquis. Herzog & de Meuron 1981-2000. Between the Face and the Landscape. The Cunning of Cosmetics. Entre el Rostro y el Paisaje. La Astucia de la Cosmética.” 2nd adv. and rev. ed. Vol. No. 60+84, Madrid, El Croquis, 2005.

Rowan Moore: “Architecture in Motion.” In: Tate Trustees 2005 (Eds.). “Tate Modern: The First Five Years.” London, Tate, 2005. pp. 29-32.

Nobuyuki Yoshida (Ed.): “Architecture and Urbanism. Herzog & de Meuron 1978-2002.” Tokyo, A+U Publishing Co., Ltd., 02.2002.

Herzog & de Meuron. Natural History.” Edited by: Philip Ursprung. Exh. Cat. Herzog & de Meuron. Archaeology of the Mind. Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal. 23 October 2002 – 6 April 2003. 2nd ed. Baden, Lars Müller, 2005.

Dietmar Steiner, Jacques Herzog: “Tate Modern, Londra. Tate Modern, London. Intervista di Dietmar Steiner. Interview by Dietmar Steiner.” In: François Burkhardt (Ed.). “Domus. Architettura, Design, Arte, Comunicazione. Architecture, Design, Art, Communication.” Vol. No. 828, Milan, Domus S.p.A., 07.2000. pp. 32-43.

“Herzog & de Meuron. Bauen für die Welt.” In: “Du. Die Zeitschrift der Kultur.” Vol. No. 706, Zurich, TA Media AG, Hans Heinrich Coninx, 05.2000. pp. 6-61

Jeffrey Kipnis: “Die List der Kosmetik.” In: “Du. Die Zeitschrift der Kultur.” Vol. No. 706, Zurich, TA Media AG, Hans Heinrich Coninx, 05.2000. pp. 6-44

Rowan Moore, Raymund Ryan: “Building Tate Modern. Herzog & de Meuron transforming Giles Gilbert Scott.” London, Tate Gallery Publishing Ltd., 2000.

Hubertus Adam: “Südlich der Themse. Umbau der Bankside Power Station zur neuen Tate Gallery.” In: Peter Rumpf (Ed.). Bauwelt. Vol. No. 23, Gütersloh, Bertelsmann Fachzeitschriften GmbH, 16.06.2000. pp. 26-33.

“Tate Modern in London.” In: Christian Schittich (Ed.). “Detail. Zeitschrift für Architektur und Baudetail. Review of Architecture. Umnutzung, Ergänzung, Sanierung.” Vol. No. 7, Munich, Institut für internationale Architektur-Dokumentation GmbH, 10.2000. pp. 1251-1261

“Tate. The Art Magazine. Tate Modern Special Issue.” Vol. No. 21, London, Spafax Publishing, 2000.

Gerhard Mack, Jacques Herzog: “Das Museum als städtischer Raum. Gespräch mit Jacques Herzog zu den Projekten Museum of Modern Art, New York, und Tate Gallery of Modern Art, London.” In: “Kunstmuseen. Auf dem Weg ins 21. Jahrhundert.” Basel / Berlin / Boston, Birkhäuser, 1999. pp. 36-44.

Jacques Herzog, Sabine Kraft, Christian Kühn: “Mit allen Sinnen spüren. Jacques Herzog im Gespräch mit Sabine Kraft und Christian Kühn.” In: Sabine Kraft, Nikolaus Kuhnert, Günther Uhlig (Eds.). “Archplus. Zeitschrift für Architektur und Städtebau. Architektur natürlich.” Vol. No. 142, Aachen, ARCH+ Verlag GmbH, 07.1998. pp. 32-39.

Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron, Christine Binswanger, Harry Gugger: “Three Current Projects. Tate Gallery of Modern Art at Bankside in London. Kunstkiste Bonn. Dominus Winery Yountville-Napa.” In: Herzog & de Meuron. Urban Projects. Collaboration with Artists. Three Current Projects. Exh. Cat. “Architectures of Herzog & de Meuron: Portraits by Thomas Ruff.” TN Probe Exhibition Space, Tokyo. 22 November 1996 – 9 January 1997. Tokyo, TN Probe Toriizaka Networking, 1997. Vol. No. 4. pp. 119-141.

Cynthia C. Davidson, Jacques Herzog: “An Interview with Herzog & de Meuron.” In: Cynthia C. Davidson (Ed.). “Any. Tate Frames Architecture.” Vol. No. 13, New York, Anyone Corporation, 1996. pp. 48-59

Location