Herzog & de Meuron
Competition
1986
Realization
1987
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Process

Location of the pavilion in the park.

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The letters, E, D, E, N are used as struts between floor and ceiling. Picture H shows a photomontage of the pavilion with model and photo of the park, picture L shows the column-like stretched “D” in the model.

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The drawn pages from a project presentation enhance the minimalist character of the pavilion with their graphic means. Especially the floor and ceiling panels remind one of Minimal Art paintings. The geometry points to the largest possible taking back of the newly designed cultural space into the existing nature.

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The pavilion integrates itself quite nicely into the environment of the park landscape without losing its presence. The visitor is surprised by the subliminal play between natural and artificial form. The black concrete adequately distinguishes itself from the green and brown in the park. The broken-up roof of the concrete grid can be experienced as the architectural translation of a roof of leaves with its flickering light. The floor plate is on the level of the grass and visually seems to distinguish itself from the grass only through a different spatial depth. The supports connect with the tree trunks into a group of verticals, oscillating between nature and technology. Only from one location can the four letters be read as the word EDEN; otherwise, they tend to fall into meaningless, architecturally bound forms with biomorphic allusions, answering to the rather arbitrary park landscape.

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Drawings

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Team

Facts

Planning
Architect Planning : Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd., Basel, Switzerland
Construction Management: Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd., Basel, Switzerland
Structural Engineering: Helmut Pauli, Ingenieurbüro Schaub, Basel, Switzerland
Specialist / Consulting
Concrete Elements Consulting: G. Müller AG, Rheinfelden, Switzerland
Building Data
Footprint: 333 sqft, 31 sqm
Gross volume (GV): 3'990 cbft, 113 cbm

Bibliography

Ulrich Karl Pfannschmidt: “Gartenpavillon Rheinfelden / Schweiz.” In: Stiftung des BDA Bayern e.V. (Ed.). “Kleine Bauten der Infrastruktur. Wie das Unsichtbare sichtbar wird.” Exh. Cat. “Kleine Bauten der Infrastruktur.” München. 15 January – 26 February 2010. München, Stiftung des BDA Bayern e.V., 2009. p. 7.

Nobuyuki Yoshida (Ed.): “Architecture and Urbanism. Herzog & de Meuron 1978-2002.” Tokyo, A+U Publishing Co., Ltd., 02.2002.

Gerhard Mack, Herzog & de Meuron: “Herzog & de Meuron 1978-1988. Das Gesamtwerk. Band 1. The Complete Works. Volume 1.” Edited by: Gerhard Mack. Basel / Boston / Berlin, Birkhäuser, 1997. Vol. No. 1.

Ulrike Jehle-Schulte Strathaus: “Von Häusern und Bäumen.” In: Architekturmuseum in Basel (Ed.). “Herzog & de Meuron. Architektur Denkform.” Exh. Cat. “Herzog & de Meuron. Architektur Denkform.” Architekturmuseum Basel. 1 October – 20 November 1988. Basel, Wiese AG, 1988. pp. 8-13.